• CORE ENGLISH COURSES

    All students must successfully complete four years of study in English Language Arts. Elective courses are considered enrichment courses; they may not be substituted for English courses required for graduation but may contribute toward graduation. Elective courses must be taken in addition to, not in place of, core courses.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 H: 9 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. Students of English H should be highly motivated, eager readers who are able to read independently several texts during the same unit. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry, and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and JulietThe Odyssey, and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will be able to manage large writing assignments independently. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing, and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Orgel’s Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 A: 9 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and JulietThe Odyssey (text or Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing, and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 A/ICR: 9 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and student work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and JulietThe Odyssey (text or Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 R: 9 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey (excerpts from Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book D) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 R/ICR: 9 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and JulietThe Odyssey (excerpts from Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book D) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH CONCEPTS 9 (5 credits)

    This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 9th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 H: 10 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. Students of English 2H are highly motivated, eager readers who are able to read several texts during the same unit. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including the personal commentary, multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Orgel’s Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 A: 10 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students will work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 A/ICR: 10 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and student will work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 R: 10 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study one Greek and one Shakespearean play. In addition, they will read other works which are more contemporary. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks, multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book E) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 R/ICR: 10 (5 credits)

    English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study one Greek and one Shakespearean play. In addition, they will read other works which are more contemporary. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book E) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH CONCEPTS 10 (5 credits)

    This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 10th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

    AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 11 (5 credits)

    This course is designed to prepare students for the AP English Language and Composition exam. It helps “students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” The overarching objective of the course is to “enable students to write effectively and confidently.” Students “read complex primary and secondary sources carefully and with understanding, synthesize materials from these texts in their own compositions, and cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations.” They develop their “awareness of their own composing processes: the way they explore ideas, reconsider strategies, and revise their work.” Students write expository, analytical and argumentative essays. Vocabulary study is ongoing and is linked to reading and writing. This course prepares students for the AP exam in the spring of junior year.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 A: 11 (5 credits)

    English 3 A is a study of representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism and the Melting Pot. Focusing on analytical and critical reading skills, students will study works of representative American authors. Students will be expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. To strengthen the ability to convey meaning, students will revise and edit their work. Each student is required to complete the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 A/ICR: 11 (5 credits)

    English 3 A/ICR is a study of representative authors from American literature through a thematic or chronological structure. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism and the Melting Pot. Focusing on analytical and critical reading skills, students will study works of representative American authors. Students will be expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skill development will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. To strengthen the ability to convey meaning, students will revise and edit their work. Each student is required to complete the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 R: 11 (5 credits)

    English 3 R students will study representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism, and the Melting Pot. Students will further develop and use analytical reading skills through a study of representative American authors. They are expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. Each student is required to practice the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 R/ICR: 11 (5 credits)

    English 3 R/ICR students will study representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism, and the Melting Pot. Students will further develop and use analytical reading skills through a study of representative American authors. They are expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. Each student is required to practice the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to ongoing reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH CONCEPTS 11 (5 credits)

    This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 11th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

    AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION: 12 (5 credits)

    The equivalent in scope and rigor of a year of college-level work, English 4 AP is a challenging course of language and literature. Students should be highly motivated and eager readers whose critical writing is both controlled and incisive. In any unit of study, the student is often required to read several texts. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read at least one Shakespearean play. Ongoing composition study provides opportunities to enhance fluency, to improve expository skills, to write creatively, and to practice revision skills. Students are required to use a variety of research strategies (including the Oxford English Dictionary, Shakespeare Concordance, primary and secondary sources, classic and contemporary scholarly criticism, etc.) This course prepares students for the AP exam in the spring of senior year.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 A: 12 (5 credits)

    English 4 A students will examine masterpieces of British and other literary traditions selected according to theme, movement, period and/or culture. In any unit of study, the student must be able to manage more than one text. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read a Shakespearean play. Through editing and revision, students will refine their writing. A research paper and a demonstration of the research process is a course requirement. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 A/ICR: 12 (5 credits)

    English 4 A/ICR students will examine masterpieces of British and other literary traditions selected according to theme, movement, period and/or culture. In any unit of study, the student must be able to manage more than one text. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read a Shakespearean play. Through editing and revision, students will refine their writing. A research paper and a demonstration of the research process is a requirement. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 R: 12 (5 credits)

    English 4 R students will study works of British literature and other masterpieces from classic and contemporary traditions. Students are encouraged to critically analyze texts. Emphasis will be placed upon the link between form and content. As a part of their reading, students will read a Shakespearean play. In any unit of study, students must be able to manage more than one text. Research writing and a demonstration of the process is a course requirement. Composition and vocabulary study are ongoing and linked to reading and writing.

    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 R/ICR: 12 (5 credits)

    English 4 R/ICR students will study works of British literature and other masterpieces from classic and contemporary traditions. Students are encouraged to critically analyze texts. Emphasis will be placed upon the link between form and content. As a part of their reading, students will read a Shakespearean play. In any unit of study, students must be able to manage more than one text. Research writing and a demonstration of the process is a course requirement. Composition and vocabulary study are ongoing and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

    ENGLISH CONCEPTS 12 (5 credits)

    This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 12th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-
    BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE 9, 10, 11, 12 (10 credits)

    This course is scheduled in place of or in addition to mainstream English for speakers of other languages who have no, little or some facility with English. The class meets daily. Students learn the basics through listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing. American customs and culture will also be introduced.

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-INTERMEDIATE 9, 10,11,12 (5 credits)

    This course is for speakers of other languages in addition to their regular English class. This one-period class is for students who have demonstrated limited competency in English the support of a literacy-rich learning environment where speaking, listening, reading, and writing are the emphasis.

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-ADVANCED 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

    This course is for speakers of other languages in addition to their regular English class. This one-period class is for students who have demonstrated some competency in English but need the support of a literacy-rich learning environment where speaking, listening, reading, and writing are emphasized.

    CORE ENGLISH ELECTIVES

    Electives without level designation are not included in weighted class rank.

    ADVANCED COMPOSITION A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Advanced Composition is a comprehensive writing class that will guide students through writing processes in detail and expose them to many different essay styles. Both student and professional writing samples will guide students in their writing, as well as teacher feedback and peer editing. Discussions will focus on compositional techniques. Student-teacher conferences will serve to monitor analysis of student’s writing samples.

    CREATIVE WRITING A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Creative writing is an English elective designed for those students who have developed an interest in writing through the regular English curriculum and who wish to pursue this interest further. The course focuses on developing student creativity through the study and writing of essays, short stories, a journal, poetry, play, and other areas of student ability and interest. Creative Writing attempts to heighten student awareness of the limitless possibilities for writing in their daily lives. Students are encouraged through interaction with their teacher to see these possibilities and to develop their abilities to their fullest.

    GREAT BOOKS A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Through the power to stimulate the imagination, Great Books explores what it means to be human. Through reading and discussion of the literary canon, students understand the rich heritage of Western Culture and the human conditions. This course offers the student an opportunity to read from a wide variety of canonical offerings: Shakespeare, classic American novels, myths, science fiction, the Bible, and fairy tales. The student will read Greek and Roman epics and myths, and ancient and modern works. Discussions will be conducted in a seminar fashion.

    THE HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE: A SEARCH FOR CONSCIENCE H/A: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    This one-semester course will focus on the study of the Holocaust of World War II. The course provides a multidimensional view that seeks to examine the inhumanity of those who perpetrated it, the horror of those who endured it, the valor of those who resisted it, and the shame of those who ignored it. Students will analyze official documents, newspaper and essay accounts, literature, music, art, and cinema as expressions of both the culture of the oppressor and the culture of the oppressed, as they seek to understand why nations and individuals turn to hatred and even genocide as a way of coping with the pressures of life.

    JOURNALISM 1 H/A`: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

    Journalism 1 H/A is an introduction to both print and online media. The course emphasizes the power of communication in writing and provides techniques and practice for writing news, features, reviews, editorials, columns, and sports articles. Students will also learn approaches to investigative reporting and will learn the code of ethics to which journalists adhere. Students will examine the role of the objective reporters as well as the role of the press in society. The following skills will also be covered: headline construction, copy editing, and caption writing. Student work will be considered for publication in the school newspaper.

    JOURNALISM 2 H/A: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
    PREPARATION: Successful completion of Journalism 1, newspaper editorial board or equivalent

    In Journalism 2 H/A, students will participate in extensive studies of and experiments with the modern concepts, techniques and psychologies used in newspaper design and image preparation. Students will complete investigative reports and write in depth articles on a variety of timely issues. The course will include assignments, which require written, practical, and creative responses. Students will be encouraged to be published in the school paper.

    BROADCASTING 1: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Throughout the semester, students create a variety of projects that explore basic principles of pre-production, cinematography, and editing. Areas of study may include stop motion, movie trailers, news reporting, and commercial, music video, and short film production. Students will also analyze professional work in hopes of understanding the culture and the impact of Digital Media as a mass medium.

    BROADCASTING 2: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
    PREPARATION: Successful completion of Broadcasting 1

    Throughout the semester, students create a variety of projects that explore advanced principles of pre-production, cinematography, and editing. Areas of study may include the film as narrative, documentary, and literary adaptation, as well as broadcast journalism. Students may also have the freedom to explore topics of their choice. Students will also continue analyzing professional work in hopes of understanding the culture and the impact of Digital Media as a mass medium. It is strongly recommended that the student initially take Broadcasting I before enrolling in this course.

    PUBLIC SPEAKING: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Public Speaking enables students of all ability levels to gain confidence and poise when speaking in both small and large group situations. The student will learn the strategies and techniques of effective speaking then practice their speaking skills in a variety of real life situations. These include, but are not limited to, interviews, acceptance speeches, presentations, impromptu situations, and persuasive speeches. Students will participate in a culminating activity by staging a formal debate based on policy format with topics related to current affairs.

    WRITING WORKSHOP 1 H/A: 9, 10 (2.5 credits)

    The goal of this elective is to introduce students to various genres of writing that they may not have the opportunity to explore in depth in their required English classes. Students will explore memoir, poetry, journalism, and/or other styles of writing through careful study of sample pieces. They will then engage in the writing process to create pieces that follow the characteristics of the genre. In addition, time will be spent reading and practicing a variety of essay types, including PARCC and SAT essays. At the conclusion of the course, students will work on expanding and revising one of their works through further exploration of the genre with an aim toward publication.

    FILM APPRECIATION: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    Film Appreciation introduces students to a variety of landmark films from different historic periods, challenging them to look beyond the contemporary and understand the heritage of cinema. Throughout the semester, students will explore several genres, gaining insight into what happens both on screen and behind the scenes. By engaging with a variety of media, students enhance their ability to both view and write critically about films. Each semester brings a different “classic playlist” as well as a spattering of modern selections. Thus, students can take the course—for credit—more than once! Whether you’re already a serious film buff or aspiring to become one, “film” is for you.

    SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 9 (Full Year) (5 credits)

    In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation, or PARCC 8 Language Arts. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course.

    SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 10 (Full Year) (5 credits)

    In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation or PARCC 9 Language Arts score. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course.

    SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS: 11 (Full Year) (5 credits)

    In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation or PARCC 10 Language Arts score. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill, and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course. Students will receive a grade in this course.

    SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS: 12 (Full Year) (5 credits)

    In addition to their core content course, this course is required for students who have not met the required graduation assessment. This course will prepare students to successfully complete the Accuplacer, ASVAB, or portfolio assessment to meet the graduation requirement.