Social Studies

  • CORE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

    WORLD CIVILIZATIONS

    WORLD CIVILIZATIONS H:  9 (5 credits)

    This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400.  The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century.  Required readings include primary source documents and literature.  This course is designed for students with excellent reading, writing, and oral communication skills.  

    WORLD CIVILIZATIONS A:  9 (5 credits)

    This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400.  The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century.  Required readings include a variety of primary source documents.  This course is designed for students with above average reading, writing, and oral communication skills.  

    WORLD CIVILIZATIONS A/ICR:  9 (5 credits)

    This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400.  The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century.  Required readings include a variety of primary source documents.  This course is designed for students with above average reading, writing, and oral communication skills. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP.

    WORLD CIVILIZATIONS CONCEPTS: 9 (5 credits)

    The course is a survey of the development of major civilizations within Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East from 1400-present.  The curriculum is designed to emphasize the development of various skills.  These skills include:  writing and revision, note-taking, content reading, main idea, technology, oral presentations, map interpretations, vocabulary, organization, cooperative learning, critical thinking and problem solving, and current events.  Using a thematic approach, the course will explore various topics concerning diverse peoples of the world including gender and minority issues, economic systems, technological advancements, conflict resolutions, art, literature, music, and religious and philosophical traditions.  This course is only available to students with IEPs. 

    UNITED STATES HISTORY I

    AP US HISTORY I:  10, 11 (5 credits)

    This class, the first in a two-year sequence, is one of the most challenging courses offered by the Social Studies Department. It provides a study of historical events, concepts, interpretations, and themes within a framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1877.  It is designed for highly motivated students with excellent proficiency in reading and well-developed analytic writing skills. The rigors of the course include complex primary source readings, AP-styled assessments including multiple choice, free response and document based questions, and command of a college-level textbook.  Students will be asked to respond to sophisticated questions about the past, relate these questions to the present, identify new questions, and pursue individual topics of interest. In addition, these students should be prepared to analyze multiple interpretations of the past and develop new interpretations that respond to the needs of the present.  Participants in this course are expected to prepare for and take the AP US History Exam at the end of US History II AP.

    US HISTORY I A:  10 (5 credits)

    This course allows students to examine historical events, concepts and themes within the framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1900.  It is designed for students who have above average proficiency in reading, well-developed writing and oral communications skills, and an interest in history. In addition, students will be required to analyze multiple interpretations of American History and explain why these interpretations emerged when they did.  

    US HISTORY I A/ICR:  10 (5 credits)

    This course allows students to examine historical events, concepts and themes within the framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1900.  It is designed for students who have above average proficiency in reading, well-developed writing and oral communications skills, and an interest in history. In addition, students will be required to analyze multiple interpretations of American History and explain why these interpretations emerged when they did. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP. 

    US HISTORY I CONCEPTS: 10 (5 credits)

    This is a full year survey course in American History from colonial times to 1877. The program emphasizes selected events, people and themes from the American past, but, at the same time, it provides a broad overview of American history. This course is not theoretical in nature; rather it emphasizes practical knowledge and practical skills. It is especially designed for Social Studies students who need concentrated instruction and practice to improve their reading, writing, and oral communications skills in a historical context.  This course is only available to students with IEPs.

    UNITED STATES HISTORY II

    AP US HISTORY II :  11 (5 credits)

    PREPARATION:  Successful completion of US History I  

    This course is a continuation of the US HISTORY I AP program, one of the most challenging courses offered by the Social Studies Department. In this course, highly motivated students pursue a rigorous college level survey of historical events, concepts, interpretations, and themes in American History from 1900 to the present.  This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American history and government. Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student-centered activities including debates and role-playing exercises.  Participants in this course are expected to prepare for and take the AP US History Exam at the end of the year.

    US HISTORY II A:  11 (5 credits)

    PREPARATION:  Successful completion of US History I

    In this course, students will continue the survey of American History begun in US History I (studying 20th century to the present day).  Following the pattern set in US History I A, students will examine the historical events, concepts, and themes that shaped the Twentieth Century, and discuss and evaluate differing interpretations provided by historians.  This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American History and government.  Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities including debates, role-playing exercises and independently researched presentations and projects.

    US HISTORY II A/ICR:  11 (5 credits)

    PREPARATION:  Successful completion of US History I

    In this course, students will continue the survey of American History begun in US History I (studying 20th century to the present day).  Following the pattern set in US History I A, students will examine the historical events, concepts, and themes that shaped the Twentieth Century, and discuss and evaluate differing interpretations provided by historians.  This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American History and government.  Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities including debates, role-playing exercises and independently researched presentations and projects. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP.

    US HISTORY II CONCEPTS: 11 (5 credits)

    PREPARATION:  Successful completion of World Civilization Concepts and US History 1 Concepts or CST Placement

    This is a full year survey course in American History from 1877 to Present times.  The program emphasizes selected events, people and themes from the American past, but, at the same time, it provides a broad overview of American History.  This course is not theoretical in nature; rather, it emphasizes practical knowledge and practical skills. It is especially designed for Social Studies students who need concentrated instruction and practice to improve their reading, writing, and oral communications skills in a historical context.  This course is only open to students with IEPs.

    CORE SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

    AP ECONOMICS:  MICROECONOMICS AND MACROECONOMICS:  11, 12 (5 credits)

    The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system.  It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The purpose of an AP course in Macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole.  Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth and international economics. This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in the social sciences.

    AP PSYCHOLOGY:  11, 12 (5 credits)

    This course is a challenging one-year study of psychology.  It is designed for the highly mature and motivated academic student who is interested in a systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes.  Students will be exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields of psychology. Topics of study include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, personality, abnormal behavior and its treatment, and social psychology.  In addition, students will learn about practice and critically evaluate research methods used by psychologists. The expression and preparation for the recommended Advanced Placement examination in Psychology will be emphasized.  

    PSYCHOLOGY A:  11, 12 (5 credits)

    This advanced level course is designed for the college-bound student who is interested in studying psychology.  Topics under study include motivation and emotions, sensation and perception, learning, states of consciousness, personality development, and abnormal behavior.  Students will also learn about and practice experiments, surveys, and case studies as they are used by psychologists to understand human behavior and mental processes.  Students are expected to have advanced reading and writing skills and a willingness to participate in classroom demonstrations, suggestions, role-playing simulations, and to perform outside reading and research.  This course prepares the student for college psychology as well as addressing issues relevant to one’s personal life experiences and future careers.

    AP EUROPEAN HISTORY:  11, 12 (5 credits)

    AP European History is designed for the highly motivated student who is interested in pursuing an intensive overview of the people, places, and events encompassing European history from 1350 to the present and offers the opportunity to receive dual credit hours through Camden County College.   The course is taught at the college level. It deals with events, interpretations and themes in the context of Europe and traces the global impact of these events. The students will be required to respond to complex questions of the past, identify new questions, and pursue individual topics of interest.  The students will also be asked to read various historical interpretations of the past as well as primary and secondary sources written at various times and in various European countries. They should be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities and take the advanced placement examination in May.  

    AP WORLD HISTORY- MODERN:  10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

    The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills.  The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. Focused primarily on the past thousand years of the global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional and technological precedents that along with geography, set the human stage beginning in 1200 CE Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms the organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity from this point to the present. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.

    AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT & POLITICS: 11, 12  (5 credits)

    The AP course in U.S. Government will give students an analytical perspective on government in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and the analysis of specific examples.  It requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government. The students will become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes.  This course is designed for students with excellent reading comprehension, analytical writing and oral communication skills.

    AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES, ORIGINS TO 1865 H/A: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    African American Studies to 1865 will trace African American history and culture from West African roots to emancipation.  As students study the struggles and triumphs of people of West African descent in the Americas, students will consider their efforts to forge an identity within the American mainstream.  Topics will include West African empires, the origins and development of the African slave trade, the evolution of slavery in the United States, and the development of American slave culture with an in-depth examination of the slave community, family, and religion.  Students will examine the growth of the free black community, analyze the creation of black political, social, and economic ideologies and institutions, and evaluate the effectiveness of the African American struggle against slavery with an emphasis on slave resistance, the abolitionist movement, and the Civil War.  Students will also analyze and discuss historical and literary sources, write analytical and creative papers, and engage in debates and other forms of performance assessments.

    AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES, 1865 to PRESENT  H/A: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    African American Studies since 1865 will trace Aferican American history, culture and developments post Civil War through the 21st century.  Students will study the struggles and triumphs of African Americans in the Jim Crow era. In particular, students will study the contributions of African Americans to American civilization in science, the arts, and humanities fields.  Within a historical context, students will analyze historical sources and sample the rich literature written by African Americans. They will experience the art and music of African American artists, composers, and musicians. Topics will include reconstruction, segregation, disenfranchisement, migration, and urbanization, the rise of African American protest organizations, Black Nationalism, the Harlem Renaissance, and the modern-day civil rights movement.  Students will also analyze and discuss historical and literary sources, write analytical and creative papers, and engage in debates and other forms of performance assessments. 

    UNITED STATES HISTORY 1945 TO PRESENT:  10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    The purpose of this course is to focus on the major political, social, cultural and economic events, which have shaped the nation since the conclusion of World War II.  It is an area of American history filled with monumental issues, which impacted on the American people at the apex of their power in the “American Century.” This elective is charged with a built in motivation that it studies a time most recent to the student.  Strong analytical skills and the motivation to be critical are necessary for the course.

    RESEARCH IN HUMANITIES H:  11, 12 (1-5 credits)

    Research in Humanities is a course designed for students who are interested in research.  It is designed to allow students the unique opportunity to continue exploring the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, while also doing hands-on research that will contribute to the larger scientific research community.  As part of the course, students will learn about, practice, and evaluate research methods used by psychologists. Students will conduct their own research based on their knowledge and understanding of research methodology. This course will require critical thinking skills, initiative, responsibility, leadership, and strong written and oral expression.

    UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT EAST

    AMERICAN LAW:  THEORY AND PRACTICE A:  10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    This course was first designed for students who were leaning towards a career in the legal field, but it now offers much more to a wide variety of students.  It provides practical information and problem solving opportunities that may develop knowledge and skills needed to survive in our law based society. Every purchase, lease, contract, marriage and divorce, and every crime places the citizen face to face with the law.  This course will help students understand their legal rights and responsibilities, and will provide experience with everyday legal problems and the ability to deal with such situations. Active student involvement is the key to the course, and case studies, role playing problems, mock trials, and other activities provide an assortment of materials and approaches that will appeal to a variety of students.

    UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

    THE AMERICAN LEGAL SYSTEM:  CRIMES, COURTS,

    AND TORTS:  10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    The foremost goal of the American early leaders was to create a government of laws not of men.  The American Legal System introduces students to the national and local laws and legal institutions that will affect every aspect of their lives as Americans.  Designed for the active participant, the course requires students to role play and participate in mock trials. Each student must learn to “think like a lawyer.” Faced with hypothetical scenarios in constitutional, tort, and criminal law, students must identify legal issues and advocate the position of their clients. The Art of Trial Advocacy will be the focus of the culminating project. Students will learn the strategies for delivering an opening statement, questioning witnesses during direct and cross-examination, introducing physical evidence, and delivering a closing argument while prosecuting or defending a hypothetical murder case.  Strong analytical skills and the motivation to be critical are necessary for the course.

    POLITICS OF HATRED:  RACISM IN AMERICA: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

    This course is a semester long study of intolerance and discrimination in the United States.  Students will examine the persistence of racial, religious, and ethnic prejudices that exist in today's society.  This course is designed to stimulate and motivate students to work actively to improve intergroup relationships in American society.  Students should come away from this course with the understanding, ability and commitment to help improve intergroup understanding. Some of the strategies used in this course will include research projects, related media, roleplaying, mock trials, and other simulations.  This course recognizes the diversity of the students who may select it. While many may continue their educations on a college level, some may not. This program addresses the needs of both groups by emphasizing the academic skills and the practical and problem solving opportunities necessary to enter college or the workplace.

    CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN SOCIAL STUDIES

    Social Studies electives in history, economics, psychology, and humanities provide a broad understanding of the development of human societies.  They prepare students for careers in a global society by explaining how the past has shaped current political and economic systems and conflicts.  By teaching the research methods of the social sciences, they prepare students for advanced study and research in history, economics and business, and psychology.  All elective courses in the social sciences and humanities emphasize communication skills, including writing and public speaking. Most importantly, they teach critical thinking and decision making.