High School Course Selection Booklet 2019 - 2020

Cherry Hill Public Schools High School

Course Selection Booklet

2019 - 2020

A row of books.

Learning Opportunities at

Cherry Hill High School East

and

Cherry Hill High School West

This 2019 - 2020 Course Selection Booklet will be available on the District Web Site (www.chclc.org) as well as in the school libraries, and the offices of school guidance counselors, principals, and assistant principals.


Dear Students and Parents:

Within the next few weeks, we will begin the process of scheduling courses for the 2019-2020 school year. Course selection booklets provide all students and parents with the necessary information to make informed decisions about their study. It is important that you take the time to familiarize yourself with the course offerings that are available to you, and the requirements that you must satisfy in order to meet the graduation criteria. We offer a wide range of courses that are designed to provide students with the educational foundation necessary to be successful in post-secondary life.

We believe strongly, that all students should take advantage of these opportunities by taking a full complement of eight (8) courses. We encourage parents and students to consider taking advantage of the opportunity to enroll in additional courses in our many electives in the arts and in our core departments: English, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Science. We encourage you, as a family, to take the time to map out your future aspirations and goals. In selecting your courses for next year, please keep in mind your interests and your goals, and challenge yourself to selecting courses which will enhance your education in the arts, in the sciences, and in the performance areas such as music and drama. As with all good course selection booklets, the goal is to provide you with the information necessary to determine what kind of education you want. High school is a time to challenge yourself and to rise to meet those challenges. Cherry Hill East and Cherry Hill West are two of the top high schools in the area and across the state of New Jersey. We ask that all students recognize the extraordinary offerings the Cherry Hill high schools provide.

In the months ahead, we will build a master schedule of classes; the schedule will be built based upon the courses students select. It is our hope that students select carefully and seek counsel from their parents, their teachers, and their school guidance counselors.

Sincerely,

Dr. Dennis Perry, Principal
Cherry Hill High School East

Dr. Kwame R. Morton Sr., Principal
Cherry Hill High School West

Board of Education and High School Staff

Board of Education and High School Staff

Dr. Joseph Meloche, Superintendent of Schools

CHERRY HILL BOARD OF EDUCATION

2019-2020

Eric Goodwin - Board President

Lisa Saidel - Board Vice President

Carol A. Matlack

Laurie Neary

David Rossi

Jane Scarpellino

Ruth Schultz

Sally Tong

Edward Wang, PhD


CHHS WEST STAFF

Dr. Kwame Morton, Principal

Dr. John Burns, Assistant Principal

Ms. Donean Chinn-Parker, Assistant Principal

Mr. Chuck Coligan, Assistant Principal

Mr. Abel Augie Ramos, Assistant Principal

Ms. Allison Staffin, Assistant Principal

Ms. Carole Roskoph, Director of Student Activities


WEST GUIDANCE STAFF

Mr. Nick Caputi

Ms. Suzanne Elsherif

Ms. Melissa Franzosi

Ms. Brittany Gibbs

Mr. Todd Powers

Ms. Lisa Saffici

Ms. Maggie Strimel

Ms. Cynthia Snowden

Ms. Barbara Rakoczy (SAC)


CHHS EAST STAFF

Dr. Dennis Perry, Principal

Mr. Theodore Beatty, Assistant Principal

Dr. R. Matthew Covington, Assistant Principal

Mr. Aaron Edwards, Assistant Principal

Ms. Rebecca Metzger, Assistant Principal

Mr. Lou Papa, Assistant Principal

Mr. C. J. Davis, Director of Student Activities

EAST GUIDANCE STAFF

Mr. Roberto Figueroa

Ms. Carli Keesler

Ms. Tish Schuman

Ms. Carly Friedman

Ms. Cathleen Lynch

Ms. Tracye Walsh

Ms. Laurie Grossman

Dr. Eileen Lynch

Ms. Jennifer DiStefano (SAC)

Mr. Darren Gamel

Ms. Viney (Yolanda) McClain

Table of Contents

Choosing a High School Program of Studies

CHOOSING A HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDIES

CHOOSING A HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDIES

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Primarily, the Course Selection Booklet is a planning guide for use in selecting subjects for high school next year. It consists of graduation requirements, scheduling guidelines, and a catalog of all subjects offered.

B. During the scheduling process, each student has a conference with his/her school guidance counselor in order to discuss a proposed program of study for the following year. The school guidance counselor’s discussion during this conference is based upon teacher recommendations and the student's expressed interest in the various disciplines and a career interest or vocation. Recommendations concerning sequential courses are based upon the student's ability and past achievement.

II. LEVELS

A. Many courses are offered on the following ability levels: Advanced Placement/Honors (AP/H); Accelerated (A) and Regular ®.

1. Regular -- Courses are developed to provide students with the foundation for postsecondary demands by emphasizing depth, breadth and enrichment. Courses are designed to develop the essential skills necessary for students to meet or exceed the requirements of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.

2. Accelerated (A) -- These are courses which require the ability to perform in a rigorous program at a rapid pace. They are offered at the college prep level. Courses are designed to develop the essential skills necessary for students to meet or exceed the requirements of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.

3. Honors -- Honors courses present rigorous course material, expect considerable independent student work, and move at a faster pace. Students will complete more course assignments than accelerated courses. Honors courses require students to be highly organized and willing to assume responsibility for the heightened volume and standard of honors-level academic work. Substantive critical analysis within a content-rich academic environment forms the heart of the honors academic routine. Courses are developed to further enhance students’ ability to work independently and demonstrate high levels of critical, analytical and original thinking. Courses are designed to develop the essential skills necessary for students to meet or exceed the requirements of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.

4. Advanced Placement (AP)

Courses designed as Advanced Placement (AP) are taught under guidelines established by The College Board. AP courses are college-level courses. Students enrolled in AP courses will be challenged at the highest level of academic difficulty available in a high school setting. The AP curriculum consists of a high level of rigor in content complexity and requires significant independent learning by the student. Students who take AP courses are strongly encouraged to take the accompanying Advanced Placement Examination given in May. If a student earns a grade of 3, 4, or 5 on an AP exam it is possible to receive college credit for that particular AP course while gaining tuition savings. PLEASE NOTE: The Advanced Placement test for college credit is optional. If a student chooses to take the test he/she will be responsible for the payment of the testing fee.

Scheduling Process

Scheduling Process

The master schedule is developed based upon the course selections made by students in February and March. There is always the possibility that a certain class will not be available due to heavy demand. A class may not run when an insufficient number of students elect a subject. Any changes in course selections after that time will decrease the effectiveness of the master schedule. For this reason, changes in course requests will not be permitted after the last Friday in May.

A. Any requests for a schedule change from one subject to another must be made by the second Friday in July. Although guidance counselors do not work daily in the summer, requests must be submitted (post dated/ time stamped) prior to the deadline. After the second Friday in July only schedule changes which involve a change in the designated level will be permitted.

B. DROP/ADD PERIOD - There will be a drop/add period the first two cycles (twelve school days). Requests for schedule changes must be approved by the student's parents/guardians. After this date, only level change requests will be considered.

C. LEVEL CHANGES - After the drop/add period, students cannot request a level change until the end of the first interim period (mid-October). Requests for level changes must have parent/guardian approval, current teacher approval, and must be approved by an administrator. Level change requests can be made from the end of the first interim through the end of the first cycle (six days) of second marking period.

General Information

Graduation Requirements

I. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

It is the policy of the Board of Education to provide learning opportunities and programs, which are appropriate to the abilities, needs, and interests of students in order that they may successfully complete an appropriate course of studies leading to graduation. The Board of Education shall award the same high school diploma regardless of the program of studies completed by students. A diploma, therefore, represents only the accumulation of credits; it does not guarantee acceptance into schools to further one’s education.

It is necessary that a student’s program comply with the statute and administrative code of the State of New Jersey, the requirements established by the District Board of Education, and sound principles of education before a diploma will be granted. In order to graduate a pupil must:

A. Pass all required State assessments.

B. Earn a total of 120 Credits which is comprised of required classes and additional electives

C. Meet the district attendance policy

D. Pass the following courses:

Program of Studies

Graduation Requirement

English Language Arts

4 years

Physical Education/Health

4 years

World Civilizations

1 year

United States History

2 years

Algebra 1

1 year

Geometry

1 year

Math - 3rd year

1 year

Biology

1 year

Chemistry

1 year

Physics

1 year

World Language

1 year

Visual and Performing Arts

1 year

21st Century Career and Life Skills

1 year

Financial Literacy

1 semester

Additional Information

A. Students will carry a minimum of fifteen (15) credits per semester and a minimum of thirty (30) credits per year.

B. The principal alone may, for good reason, waive the minimum of thirty (30) credits per year with the understanding that the student needs 120 credits for graduation.

C. High school level courses taken prior to Grade 9 may be used to meet prerequisites for advancement in a particular subject area and satisfy the Algebra requirement. A listing of these courses appears as a separate category on the high school transcript. However, because graduation credit requirements may only be met by courses taken in Grades 9-12, courses taken prior to Grade 9 are not included in GPA or class rank nor do they count toward graduation requirements, except Algebra, which can satisfy the content requirement, but not the credit requirement.

D. High school level courses taken in approved high school evening/day and review programs, and through distance learning, are not included in weighted or unweighted GPA or class rank.

E. If a student completes all of the graduation requirements in three years, a student may be eligible to receive a diploma. This must be approved by the principal or designee.

Graduation Assessment Requirements

II. GRADUATION ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS

Under Construction. When guidance is provided from the New Jersey Department of Education, this section will be updated.

Thank you for your patience.

Promotion and Retention

III. PROMOTION AND RETENTION

A. Students at the high school level are expected to meet the requirements of Board of Education Policy 5460: High School Graduation.

In Grades 9-12, parents should be notified each year if a student:

1. Has not met the minimum standard testing requirements outlined in the Proficiency Standards of the Board of Education Policy 5460: High School Graduation.

2. Has not met the other course requirements outlined in Board of Education Policy IHF: Graduation Requirements.

Recommendations for placement in grade level:

1. A student will be allowed to move to the next grade level with his/her class until the eleventh grade regardless of the number of credits accumulated.

2. In order to be promoted to the twelfth grade, a student must have sufficient credits (90 credits) to complete high school graduation requirements by the end of summer school following the senior year.

Four - Year Academic Planning

IV. FOUR-YEAR ACADEMIC PLANNING GUIDE

The purpose of this guide is to help the student plan a four-year academic program. It should be used after carefully reviewing graduation requirements and course descriptions, and consulting with his/her assigned school guidance counselor. All students will have a fixed lunch period and an opportunity to take 8 courses.


9TH GRADE


10TH GRADE


Courses


Credits


Courses


Credits


1. English Language Arts


5


1. English Language Arts


5


2. Physical Ed/Health


5


2. Physical Ed/Health


5


3.



3.



4.



4.



5.



5.



6.



6.



7.



7.


8.


8.




11TH GRADE


12TH GRADE


Courses


Credits


Courses


Credits


1. English Language Arts


5


1. English Language Arts


5


2. Physical Ed/Health


5


2. Physical Ed/Health


5


3.



3.



4.



4.



5.



5.



6.



6.



7.



7.



8.



8.


Marking System

V. MARKING SYSTEM

A. The following letter grades are used to indicate student progress:


MARK


NUMERICAL EQUIVALENT


A


90 - 100


B


80 - 89


C


70 - 79


D


60 - 69 [Lowest passing grade]


E


Below 60


I


Incomplete

B. An “Incomplete” is given when a student has yet to complete the work for a particular marking period. All incomplete work must be completed by the interim of the following marking period.

C. In certain situations, a “G” is given when a student is not required to complete any additional work for a given marking period.

D. Grade Point Average/Class Rank

1. Weighted Grade Point Average: To compute the weighted average using the chart above, identify the difficulty level at which a course is offered (AP/H, A, R), and multiply the weighted point value by the number of credits a course is worth. The sum of all quality points earned is then divided by the number of credits attempted. Because grades are weighted for each ability level, the weighted grade point average recognizes the level of difficulty of the courses selected. Rank is computed off of weighted GPA.

Chart of Weighting Equivalents


GRADE


AP/H


A


R


A [90 - 100]


7


6


5


B [80 - 90]


6


5


4


C [70 - 79]


5


4


3


D [60 - 69]


4


3


2

1. Un-Weighted Grade Point Average: Beginning with the class of 2000, an un-weighted grade point average will be computed in addition to the weighted grade point average. All subjects in the curriculum will be included. The final grade factor is multiplied by the number of credits assigned to each course. The sum of all points earned is then divided by the total credits attempted by each student.


GRADE


AP/H


A


R


A [90 - 100]


4


4


4


B [80 - 90]


3


3


3


C [70 - 79]


2


2


2


D [60 - 69]


1


1


1

2. Rank is calculated using weighted GPA at the end of 11th grade (6th semester), at the end of the first semester of 12th grade (7th semester), and at the end of the 12th grade (8th semester). The valedictorian is determined by the rank at the end of the 8th semester.

3. Starting with the class of 2010, Seniors will have the option to either report or not report their rank on their transcripts sent to colleges. Please see your school guidance counselor for further information and procedures as well as guidance in making this decision.

Withdrawal from Courses

VI. WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES

A. A student who is carrying the minimum required number of credits may not withdraw from a course at any time unless permission to carry a reduced load is secured from the principal.

B. A student who is carrying more than the minimum required number of credits may withdraw from the additional course(s). If the withdrawal is made in the first six weeks for a semester course and the last school day of November for a full-year course, no record of this withdrawal will be made on the student's record. After this six-week period for semester courses and the last school day of November for full-year courses, WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered on the records.

C. A student who wishes to withdraw from a course must consult his/her school guidance counselor. Additionally, the student must have permission from his/her parents to withdraw.

College Partnership Opportunities

VII. COLLEGE PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

A. Dual Credit- Camden County College

Upon satisfactory completion of course requirements, any student enrolled in this program will be able to apply this credit at those colleges/universities which accept it. Students will be required to pay a course registration fee to Camden County College.

Camden County College Offers an extensive list of courses offered for dual credit.
A complete list can be obtained from your School Counselor.

B. Dual Credit - Stockton University

Upon satisfactory completion of course requirements, any student enrolled in this program will be able to apply this credit at those colleges/universities which accept it. Students will be required to pay a course registration fee to Stockton University and attain a grade of “C” or higher. High School Courses currently offered for dual credit at Stockton University are:

Holocaust and Genocide
African American Studies

C. Dual Credit- Rowan College Burlington County (RCBC)

Upon satisfactory completion of course requirements, any student enrolled in this program will be able to apply this credit at those colleges/universities which accept it. Students will be required to pay a course registration fee to Rowan College Burlington County. All AP Courses offered at High Schools East or West are eligible for dual credit except AP Latin.

D. Workforce- Certification to Degree through Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC)

Our RCBC partnership in the workforce pathway exposes students to a curriculum that will provide licensing in a specific field of choice. The entire workforce catalog is available to our students. The two courses of study that will be offered at either Cherry Hill High School East or West will be the Cisco CCENT and CCNA Certifications and Transportation Logistics and Distribution (TLD). These two options will be available at either High School and will create a unique schedule for those students participating.

  1. Cisco Networking Academy will consist of two 140 hour courses and will provide students with a CCENT and CCNA certification upon graduation. Students will be required to pay all course registration fees to Rowan College Burlington County. (RCBC)
  2. Transportation, Logistics and Distribution (TLD) equips individuals with the latest skills and certifications, as well as connections to employers hiring in the field. This certification consists of 8 modules, each 40 hours. The modules include: Supply Chain, Management Principles, Warehouse Operations, Transportation Operations, Demand Planning, Manufacturing and service Operations, Inventory Management, Supply Management, and Procurement and Customer Service Operations. Students will complete 6 of these modules over the course of one year and complete the first 2 modules at RCBC the summer prior to entering the program during their high school senior year. Students will be required to pay all course registration fees to Rowan College Burlington County. (RCBC)
  3. Additional Workforce opportunities that may be of interest to our high school students include, but are not limited to Health Science Courses including- Pharmacy Technician, Electrocardiograph Technician, and Phlebotomy Technician. These courses are instructed on the RCBC Campus, and are connected directly to the Virtua Health System. Students will be required to pay all course registration fees to Rowan College Burlington County. (RCBC)

External Educational Opportunities

VIII. EXTERNAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

A. Online Courses

Students may opt to take an online course through an accredited college/university and receive college credits. The District will also accept online credit from an accredited high school or University online program. Any course taken outside of Cherry Hill will not be reflected in weighted or unweighted GPA.

B. Credit Recovery

Students who fail or lose credit for a required course are strongly encouraged to make the course up in the summer. This is true especially in sequential courses where prior knowledge is essential for future learning. Grades are not averaged together. Cherry Hill Public Schools do not offer summer school. A list of area high schools and vendors and their credit recovery offerings is available from your School Counselor.

C. College courses taken on college campuses BOARD POLICY 5460: Graduation

Students may opt to take a college course through an accredited college/university and receive college credits. The student is responsible for all costs associated. The course will only appear on the transcript if it fulfills a graduation requirement.

1. Two three-credit college semester courses, or the equivalent, would be equal to a full year high school course.

2. Prior approval to substitute college courses for high school courses must be received from the Principal. The college course must meet the requirements of the high school course for which it is substituted.

3. College courses taken in this manner will count toward graduation requirements, but will not be counted in class rank or weighted or unweighted GPA.

Secondary School Open Enrollment

IX. SECONDARY SCHOOL OPEN ENROLLMENT -- BOARD POLICY 5111.2: Open Enrollment

A. The Cherry Hill Board of Education recognizes the importance of providing the best possible education to all students at all schools. The Board also recognizes the importance of partnerships with the parents of our students. To those ends the Cherry Hill Board of Education supports open enrollment; therefore, open enrollment was instituted for the two high schools beginning with the 2000-2001 school year.

B. Unless students apply to attend high school under open enrollment and are accepted, they will be assigned to East and West based on the boundary guidelines in Policy 5111.2.

C. Beginning in the year 2000, unrestricted open enrollment will be available only to students entering in 9th grade and to any new student to the district.

D. When students accept admittance under the Open Enrollment Policy, they are making a commitment for the complete number of grade levels at that school.

E. Any request for a change of schools after a commitment to open enrollment must be made by application to the Board for a waiver of the Open Enrollment Policy. Students returning to their home school will return with all their grades and reports.

F. Transportation will be provided for students based on district guidelines.

G. There shall be no recruitment of students. Informational presentations shall be designed to attract students from all ability levels and from regular and special education classes.

H. The open enrollment period for school year 2019-2020 shall end on the second Friday in March.

Application Procedures for Open Enrollment

X. APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR OPEN ENROLLMENT

1. Families wishing open enrollment must submit the “District Application for Open Enrollment” to the Central Attendance Office by 4:00PM on the last day during the open enrollment period. The applications are available in the Guidance Offices of all middle and high schools.

2. All applicant families will be notified of the status of their application by the third Wednesday in March.

3. Applicants must return the “Open Enrollment Commitment Form” to the Central Attendance Office accepting or declining placement in their school choice by 4:00PM on the last school day in March. Failure to return the “Open Enrollment Commitment Form” by the deadline shall constitute a declination of open enrollment.

4. Falsification of the “District Application for Open Enrollment” or incorrect information may invalidate the request.

Audit classes

XI. AUDIT CLASSES STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO AUDIT CLASSES WITH THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS:

1. Approval of teacher, administrator, and school guidance counselor.

2. Complete all assignments, take all tests, follow all classroom rules, do make-up work as requested by the teacher, and adhere to the attendance policy of the school. If these provisions are not followed, students will be dropped and assigned to Study Hall.

3. Student’s record will show course and "Audit." No grade will be recorded.

4. Must be carrying at least 31 credits, in addition to the audited course.

5. Must be arranged and approved by the building principal or designee.

6. Audit will be on a space-available basis. A student who is auditing a class may be removed to create room for a regular credit status student.Cherry Hill administrators, staff, parents, and students have been investigating ways to make the high school experience one that is memorable and meaningful for all students. The district has compiled a number of options for seniors and underclassmen to consider in addition to the traditional curriculum listed in this guide. College partnership opportunities are announced in class, advertised around school, and promoted at Back to School Night.

Athletic and Co-curricular Eligibility

XII. ATHLETIC AND CO-CURRICULAR ELIGIBILITY

A. Athletics

1. High School

a. All interscholastic athletic activities are governed by the bylaws of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA). The following are the minimum eligibility requirements as stipulated by the NJSIAA by-laws.




GRADE 9


GRADE 10


GRADE 11


GRADE 12


September 1 [or beginning of 1st semester]



- - - - - - - - - - - - -


30 credits of

9th grade courses


30 credits of

10th grade courses


30 credits of 11th grade courses


January 31 [or beginning of 2nd semester]


15 credits of first semester in 9th grade


15 credits of first semester in 10th grade


15 credits of first semester in 11th grade


15 credits of first semester in 12th grade

b. Students participating in fall or winter activities must meet the September 1 requirements. Students participating in spring activities must meet the January 31 requirements.

2. College

For student athletes entering collegiate institutions in Division I and II, after August 1, 1996, Bylaw 14.3 [”Prop 48"] requires that student athletes meet the following requirements:

a. Division I Requirements

(1) Graduate from high school;

(2) Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 16 academic courses: This core curriculum includes at least four years of English; three of Math (Algebra I or higher); two courses in Social Science; two courses in natural or physical Science; four additional academic courses which may be taken from the already-mentioned categories, as well as World Language and Philosophy.

(3) have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (2.3 for the class of 2015 and beyond) based on a 4.0 scale and a score of 1010 (SAT January 2016 and before) or 1090 (SAT March 2016 and after) verbal and math only or a composite score of 86 on the ACT.

b. Division II Requirements

(1) Graduate from high school;

(2) Have a GPA of 2.0 (based on a maximum of 4.0) in a successfully completed core curriculum of at least 13 academic courses. This core curriculum includes three years of English; two of Math; two of Social Science; two in natural or physical Science (including at least one laboratory course); two additional courses in English, Math, natural or physical Sciences; and two additional academic courses which may be taken from the already-mentioned categories, as well as World Language, and Philosophy.

(3) Have a combined score of 820 (SAT January 2016 and before) or 900 (SAT March 2016 and after) verbal and math sections or a 68 composite score on the ACT.

c. NCAA Clearinghouse

(1) If a student-athlete is planning to enroll in college as a freshman and wishes to participate in Division I or Division II athletics, a senior must be certified by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse was established as a separate organization by the NCAA member institutions in January 1993. The Clearinghouse ensures consistent interpretation of NCAA initial-eligibility requirements for all prospective student-athletes at all member institutions.

(2) Student-athletes who want to start the Clearinghouse process should complete the necessary forms as early as their junior year. These forms are available in the Guidance Center.

(3) You can go to www.ncaa.org for approved courses. For East High School use the 6-digit login code 310-223; for West High School , use 311-377.

(4) All courses listed in this book fulfill state requirements. This is not true for NCAA requirements. Go to www.ncaa.org for more information. You may also see your coach, school guidance counselor, or the athletic director if you have a question.

Student Placement - Basic Skills Improvement

XIII. STUDENT PLACEMENT -- BASIC SKILLS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

A. In accordance with State requirements, all students whose proficiency in basic communication and computational skills is below the established State-wide standards shall receive diagnostic and support activities designed to meet each student’s identified needs.

B. Every effort shall be made to communicate with parents and students the importance of acquiring basic communication and computation skills. Parents will be informed of supplemental work required of their student.

C. In those instances when a parent is dissatisfied with the student's program plan, the parent shall have an opportunity to request a change in his/her student’s instructional program.

D. The determination as to which program is appropriate shall be made by the school's teaching and administrative staff members.

E. Parents may appeal the program plan that has been established for the individual student. Such appeals shall be made to the Building Principal, Superintendent of Schools, and Board of Education, in that order.

Affirmative Action

XIV. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

A. As required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and New Jersey Administrative Code 6:41-1.1 et seq., it is the policy of the Cherry Hill School District not to discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, creed, religion, ancestry, national origin, social or economic status, parenthood, marital status or handicap in its educational programs or activities and employment policies.

B. Each Cherry Hill Public School has a copy of the “District Affirmative Action Plan” which describes in considerable detail the district's commitment to equal educational and employment opportunities.

C. A grievance procedure for alleged violation(s) of Federal/State anti-discrimination legislation has also been established.

D. For 2018-2019, LaCoyya Weathington, Director of Pupil Services, is the Affirmative Action Officer and Bonnie Mingin, Supervisor of Pupil Services, is the District 504 Officer. They can be contacted at Cherry Hill Public Schools, 45 Ranoldo Terrace, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, 08034, 856-429-5600.

Student Records

XV. STUDENT RECORDS

According to NJSA 18A:36-19.1, educational, occupational and military recruiters have access to student information directories. To prevent your name from appearing in student directories released to the above, the parent/guardian or adult student must request such, in writing, to the principal.

Career Opportunities and Pathways

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AND PATHWAYS

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AND PATHWAYS

The Cherry Hill Public Schools offer a wide array of courses to meet the ever changing demands of the 21st century. The schools are committed to providing students with opportunities that will serve as a basis to further their education, as well as offering opportunities in non-traditional and vocational types of industry.

On the following pages are a list of courses and electives offered at both high schools, as well as a list of the 16 career clusters. The corresponding career clusters are also identified prior to each course offering to assist students in identifying courses that may fit their career aspirations. Your school guidance counselor can also help in identifying elective courses that may fit your career aspirations. The district also provides students with opportunities through early release to gain credit through work-based opportunities, as well as Tech Prep at our local community college. Throughout the year, numerous vocational and technical schools visit the high schools to provide information to the students regarding non-traditional careers. Many of our content courses also offer students information in non-traditional careers such as Agriculture, Food and Natural Sciences, Manufacturing and Transportation, Distribution and Logistics.

Course Selections 2019-2020

AIR FORCE JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS

CORE ELECTIVE AT WEST FOR ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) is a program designed to develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community. The AFJROTC program provides citizenship training and an aerospace science class for high school students. Enrollment is open to all students in grades 9-12. Good performance is rewarded through promotion to positions of increased responsibility and the awarding of medals and ribbons. Books and uniforms are provided at no cost to the student except for cleaning and minor maintenance of the uniform. Retired Air Force personnel who are state-certified aerospace science instructors teach the course. Enrollment in AFJROTC incurs NO MILITARY OBLIGATION; however, scholarship and promotion benefits are available to experienced AFJROTC cadets should the student decide to pursue a military career after graduating from high school. Cadets interested in attending any one of the service academies are encouraged to enroll in AFJROTC for all four years. ROTC scholarships and academy nominations are limited and extremely competitive.

The AFJROTC curriculum includes three components: Aerospace Science (AS), Leadership Education (LE), and Wellness. Aerospace introduces students to the principles of flight and navigation, the history of aviation, development of air power, contemporary aviation, human requirements of flight, cultural and global awareness, geography, the space environment, space programs, space technology, rocketry, propulsion, the aerospace industry and survival.

The leadership education component emphasizes discipline, responsibility, leadership, followership, citizenship, customs and courtesies, cadet corps activities, study habits, time management, communication skills, career opportunities, life skills, financial literacy, management skills, and drill.

Wellness is an official and integral part of the AFJROTC program. The objective of the wellness program is to motivate cadets to lead healthy, active lifestyles beyond program requirements and into their adult lives. Cadets will be given the opportunity to put into practice the wellness concepts that are taught in Leadership 100. Wellness includes exercise and physical activity.

Drill is taught throughout the school year as part of the leadership component in between and in conjunction with formal AS and LE academic lessons.

Proper uniform wear and grooming is required of all cadets. Cadets are required to wear the uniform one day per week throughout the school year beginning in October. Cadets unable or unwilling to wear the uniform and meet the grooming standard will be removed from the program. Uniform and grooming standards are in accordance with Air Force Instruction 36-2903, Dress and personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel. This is HQ AFJROTC policy and not negotiable for cadets or instructors. In general terms, this means a neat, clean-cut haircut and no facial hair (with the exception of a trimmed mustache) for male cadets while in uniform. For female cadets, this means their hair must be styled in such a way that the hair remains above the shirt collar while in uniform. You may Google AFI 36-2903 for more details regarding grooming standards for cadets.

AFJROTC is a full-year, 5-credit course with one exception for half-year, 2.5 credits toward high school graduation. Cadets transferring from another school’s JROTC program after one semester may earn 2.5 credits for the half-year. JROTC transfer cadets are the only students permitted half-year credit for AFJROTC. Cadet transfers may enroll in AFJROTC when approved by the guidance office and the Senior Aerospace Science Instructor.

The following are specific Aerospace Science (AS) and Leadership Education (LE) academic classes being taught in conjunction with AFJROTC Drill and Wellness for the coming academic school year:

AS 220 (Cultural Studies: An Introduction to Cultural Awareness): Required for all 9-12 cadets

Aerospace Science 220 is a customized course about the world’s cultures. It introduces students to the world’s cultures through the study of world affairs, regional studies and cultural awareness. The course delves into history, geography, religions, languages, culture, political systems, economics, social issues, environmental concerns, and human rights. It looks at major events and significant figures that have shaped each region.

LE 300 (Life Skills and Career Opportunities): Required for all 9-12 cadets

Leadership Education 300 will teach students to save, invest, and spend money wisely, as well as how to avoid the credit trap. They will learn about real-life issues such as understanding contracts, leases, warranties, legal notices, personal bills, practical and money-saving strategies for grocery shopping, apartment selection, and life with roommates. The Holland Interest Inventory and other self-assessments will help reveal their attitudes, aptitudes, and personal skills. This self-understanding will allow them to explore career paths and understand what they will need to be successful in work and life.

AS 400 (Management of the Cadet Corps): 12th grade, 4th-year cadets assigned to the top five unit staff positions only

Senior cadets manage the entire corps during their fourth year in the AFJROTC program. This hands-on experience affords cadets the opportunity to put theories of previous leadership courses into practice. Planning, organizing, coordinating, directing, controlling, and decision-making will be done by cadets. They will put into practice their communication, decision-making, personal-interaction, managerial, and organizational skills.

CADET LEADERSHIP COURSE (CLC) (2.5 credits only)

CLC is a summer leadership course conducted every June at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Fort Dix, NJ. It is a compilation of academics, physical fitness, drill and ceremonies, and hands-on problem solving. Cadets reside in Ft. Dix dormitories and eat in the dining hall. During the course of the school, cadets use the Obstacle Course, Confidence Course, and Leadership Reaction Course to fine-tune their leadership and teamwork skills. Cadets are supervised and chaperoned by qualified AFJROTC instructors and volunteers. Fully-qualified EMT personnel are present full time at CLC. CLC is a selective and voluntary program. An enrollment fee is required per cadet to offset miscellaneous expenses not covered by the Air Force such as medical support, supplies, printing and transportation.

Business

The following Business Education “course clusters” concentrate on career possibilities, self-awareness, and subject content. Students gain skills and information essential to fulfill their college/career goals. Specific college/career-related issues are presented through motivating activities, such as guest speakers, business simulations, mentoring, internships and student organizations. Courses taken in the Business Education Department meet the New Jersey Learning Standards.

CORE BUSINESS ELECTIVES

BUSINESS LAW: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course is designed to help students recognize and respond effectively to everyday legal problems in the business environment. Besides promoting a broad understanding of criminal and civil laws affecting business and giving insight into many aspects of juvenile law, this program specifically analyzes the law as applied in business contracts, insurance, property, consumer protection, and employment. Students enrolled in the Business Law class are eligible to become members of DECA.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course is designed to give students a firm foundation in business operations and management. Students learn about the characteristics of business, marketing functions, leadership styles and the social, ethical, economic, and international environments in business. They also study the legal forms of business ownership and discuss and research current problems and topics in business management. Students practice the application of management techniques in problem solving and develop the managerial skills needed in leadership positions. Students enrolled in Business Management are eligible to become members of DECA.

MARKETING MANAGEMENT I: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
A and H Levels
Preparation: Introduction to Business or Department Supervisor permission

This course is the first of two year-long courses; however, it may be taken independently if the prerequisite above is satisfied. The course serves to integrate skills and knowledge needed to be successful in our diverse global marketplace. Content includes: business management, management strategies, legal forms of business ownership, business law and ethics, contract law, economics and the market economy, finance and accounting, analysis and use of financial records, business and interpersonal communications, and teamwork. Participation in DECA is integral to the course.

MARKETING MANAGEMENT II: 11, 12 (5 credits)
A and H Levels
Preparation: Marketing Management I

Marketing Management II is a year long course. In the highly competitive global marketplace, students need integrated skills and knowledge to work in a diverse environment. This course will cover the following areas: Leadership, Financial Analysis, Corporate Governance, and Social Responsibility.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This is a semester course whose main focus is completing a business plan including: marketing research, analysis of the business opportunity, type of ownership, marketing plan, and a proposed financial plan. Students will learn the factors that a new business owner must consider, such as a study of demographics, legal requirements, financial considerations, and operational function. The business plan outline is designed to meet the requirements for the Entrepreneurship Participating Event for state competition at DECA.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course provides an understanding of the global marketplace and explains how businesses interact with each other. Topics include global telecommunications, intercultural communications, international trade, traveling around the world, and other relevant units that increase students' knowledge of today and of tomorrow's workplace. Students in this course are eligible to participate in DECA.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course is a semester course designed as an introduction to the business world. Topics include the study of economic concepts and our global economy, entrepreneurship, social responsibility, marketing in today’s world, business ownership and operations, and technology in business. Students enrolled in Introduction to Business are eligible to become members of DECA.

PERSONAL FINANCIAL LITERACY: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

All students will develop skills and strategies that promote personal and financial responsibility related to financial planning, savings, investment, and charitable giving in the global economy. Units include: income and careers, money management, credit and debt management, planning, saving and investing, consumerism, and risk management and insurance. Students enrolled in this course are NOT eligible for DECA participation.

MARKETING EDUCATION: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

This course gives the student the opportunity to focus on product promotion, creative advertisement and role-playing retail situations, researching problems and providing solutions. Other topics covered include career exploration, basic marketing concepts, the sales process, publicity and public relations, visual merchandising and display, and fashion merchandising. Students enrolled in this course are eligible to become members of DECA.

ADVANCED MARKETING: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Marketing I, Marketing Education or teacher recommendation

This course gives students the opportunity to design a marketing research study, conduct market research, prepare a strategic plan, and analyze the findings and conclusions in a written and oral presentation. Students focus on interpersonal communication skills and the responsibilities of business to society at large in areas of environmentalism, consumerism, and business ethics. Students explore production, buying, distribution, and pricing strategies. This course is intended for students planning to enter college in business fields such as business administration, management, marketing, and finance. Work experience is not a course requirement. Students enrolled in Advanced Marketing are eligible to become members of DECA.

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Marketing I, Marketing Education or teacher recommendation

This course is designed for students planning to major in business management, marketing, and/or sports and entertainment marketing at the postsecondary level. The concepts introduced in Marketing I will be used as a foundation in this industry-specific course. Students will apply marketing and management functions and tasks used in amateur or professional sports or sporting events, entertainment or entertainment events, selling or renting of supplies and equipment used for recreational or sporting purposes, products and services related to hobbies or cultural events, or business primarily engaged in satisfying the desire to make productive or enjoyable use of leisure time. Students enrolled in Sports and Entertainment Marketing will be eligible to become members of DECA.

English

CORE ENGLISH COURSES

All students must successfully complete four years of study in English Language Arts. Elective courses are considered enrichment courses; they may not be substituted for English courses required for graduation but may contribute toward graduation. Elective courses must be taken in addition to, not in place of, core courses.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 H: 9 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. Students of English H should be highly motivated, eager readers who are able to read independently several texts during the same unit. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry, and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey, and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will be able to manage large writing assignments independently. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing, and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Orgel’s Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 A: 9 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey (text or Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing, and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 A/ICR: 9 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and student work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey (text or Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on the first ten lessons of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 R: 9 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey (excerpts from Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book D) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 1 R/ICR: 9 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 9 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey (excerpts from Fagles edition), and a unit on classical Greek and Roman mythology. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (based on the readings and on lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book D) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH CONCEPTS 9 (5 credits)

This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 9th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 H: 10 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. Students of English 2H are highly motivated, eager readers who are able to read several texts during the same unit. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including the personal commentary, multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Orgel’s Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 A: 10 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students will work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 A/ICR: 10 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and student will work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study works from the classical to the contemporary including Greek and Shakespearean drama. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice, and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons eleven to twenty of Building an Enriched Vocabulary) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 R: 10 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study one Greek and one Shakespearean play. In addition, they will read other works which are more contemporary. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks, multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book E) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 2 R/ICR: 10 (5 credits)

English is a required course for students in grade 10 where teachers and students work together to address a variety of learning styles. The course content includes readings from the five genres: the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction. As part of their reading with the class, students will study one Greek and one Shakespearean play. In addition, they will read other works which are more contemporary. Students will also have an opportunity to read controlled choices and/or independent choices. Writing is a strong component of the course. Students will engage in a variety of writing tasks including multi-paragraph persuasive and expository essays, shorter PARCC and SAT practice and other responses. To develop writing skills, students will practice such activities as self-evaluation, peer editing and teacher conferences. Through extensive writing practice, students will enhance fluency and improve expository and revision skills. Vocabulary study (from the readings and from lessons one to ten of Shostak, Vocabulary Workshop, Book E) and grammar study are integrated into the reading and writing curriculum. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH CONCEPTS 10 (5 credits)

This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 10th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 11 (5 credits)

This course is designed to prepare students for the AP English Language and Composition exam. It helps “students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” The overarching objective of the course is to “enable students to write effectively and confidently.” Students “read complex primary and secondary sources carefully and with understanding, synthesize materials from these texts in their own compositions, and cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations.” They develop their “awareness of their own composing processes: the way they explore ideas, reconsider strategies, and revise their work.” Students write expository, analytical and argumentative essays. Vocabulary study is ongoing and is linked to reading and writing. This course prepares students for the AP exam in the spring of junior year.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 A: 11 (5 credits)

English 3 A is a study of representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism and the Melting Pot. Focusing on analytical and critical reading skills, students will study works of representative American authors. Students will be expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. To strengthen the ability to convey meaning, students will revise and edit their work. Each student is required to complete the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 A/ICR: 11 (5 credits)

English 3 A/ICR is a study of representative authors from American literature through a thematic or chronological structure. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism and the Melting Pot. Focusing on analytical and critical reading skills, students will study works of representative American authors. Students will be expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skill development will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. To strengthen the ability to convey meaning, students will revise and edit their work. Each student is required to complete the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 R: 11 (5 credits)

English 3 R students will study representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism, and the Melting Pot. Students will further develop and use analytical reading skills through a study of representative American authors. They are expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. Each student is required to practice the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 3 R/ICR: 11 (5 credits)

English 3 R/ICR students will study representative authors from American literature thematically or chronologically. Students will explore distinctly American themes, such as the American Dream, the Settlement of the Frontier, Rugged Individualism, and the Melting Pot. Students will further develop and use analytical reading skills through a study of representative American authors. They are expected to manage more than one text at the same time. Composition skills will be ongoing and center on expository and creative writing. Each student is required to practice the research process and to submit a properly documented research paper. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to ongoing reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH CONCEPTS 11 (5 credits)

This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 11th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION: 12 (5 credits)

The equivalent in scope and rigor of a year of college-level work, English 4 AP is a challenging course of language and literature. Students should be highly motivated and eager readers whose critical writing is both controlled and incisive. In any unit of study, the student is often required to read several texts. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read at least one Shakespearean play. Ongoing composition study provides opportunities to enhance fluency, to improve expository skills, to write creatively, and to practice revision skills. Students are required to use a variety of research strategies (including the Oxford English Dictionary, Shakespeare Concordance, primary and secondary sources, classic and contemporary scholarly criticism, etc.) This course prepares students for the AP exam in the spring of senior year.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 A: 12 (5 credits)

English 4 A students will examine masterpieces of British and other literary traditions selected according to theme, movement, period and/or culture. In any unit of study, the student must be able to manage more than one text. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read a Shakespearean play. Through editing and revision, students will refine their writing. A research paper and a demonstration of the research process is a course requirement. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 A/ICR: 12 (5 credits)

English 4 A/ICR students will examine masterpieces of British and other literary traditions selected according to theme, movement, period and/or culture. In any unit of study, the student must be able to manage more than one text. The historical context, persistent themes, style and content of selected masterpieces of British and other literary traditions are the focus of this course. All students will read a Shakespearean play. Through editing and revision, students will refine their writing. A research paper and a demonstration of the research process is a requirement. Vocabulary study is an ongoing activity and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 R: 12 (5 credits)

English 4 R students will study works of British literature and other masterpieces from classic and contemporary traditions. Students are encouraged to critically analyze texts. Emphasis will be placed upon the link between form and content. As a part of their reading, students will read a Shakespearean play. In any unit of study, students must be able to manage more than one text. Research writing and a demonstration of the process is a course requirement. Composition and vocabulary study are ongoing and linked to reading and writing.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 4 R/ICR: 12 (5 credits)

English 4 R/ICR students will study works of British literature and other masterpieces from classic and contemporary traditions. Students are encouraged to critically analyze texts. Emphasis will be placed upon the link between form and content. As a part of their reading, students will read a Shakespearean play. In any unit of study, students must be able to manage more than one text. Research writing and a demonstration of the process is a course requirement. Composition and vocabulary study are ongoing and linked to reading and writing. This course is co-taught and is available to students with an IEP.

ENGLISH CONCEPTS 12 (5 credits)

This course is available for special education students who have challenges related to reading and writing. This course focuses on developing basic reading and writing skills. The students will be exposed to a modified 12th grade R level curriculum integrating the core literature and writing activities for English seminar. Small class size allows for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-
BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE 9, 10, 11, 12 (10 credits)

This course is scheduled in place of or in addition to mainstream English for speakers of other languages who have no, little or some facility with English. The class meets daily. Students learn the basics through listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing. American customs and culture will also be introduced.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-INTERMEDIATE 9, 10,11,12 (5 credits)

This course is for speakers of other languages in addition to their regular English class. This one-period class is for students who have demonstrated limited competency in English the support of a literacy-rich learning environment where speaking, listening, reading, and writing are the emphasis.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS-ADVANCED 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

This course is for speakers of other languages in addition to their regular English class. This one-period class is for students who have demonstrated some competency in English but need the support of a literacy-rich learning environment where speaking, listening, reading, and writing are emphasized.

CORE ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Electives without level designation are not included in weighted class rank.

ADVANCED COMPOSITION A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Advanced Composition is a comprehensive writing class that will guide students through writing processes in detail and expose them to many different essay styles. Both student and professional writing samples will guide students in their writing, as well as teacher feedback and peer editing. Discussions will focus on compositional techniques. Student-teacher conferences will serve to monitor analysis of student’s writing samples.

CREATIVE WRITING A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Creative writing is an English elective designed for those students who have developed an interest in writing through the regular English curriculum and who wish to pursue this interest further. The course focuses on developing student creativity through the study and writing of essays, short stories, a journal, poetry, play, and other areas of student ability and interest. Creative Writing attempts to heighten student awareness of the limitless possibilities for writing in their daily lives. Students are encouraged through interaction with their teacher to see these possibilities and to develop their abilities to their fullest.

GREAT BOOKS A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Through the power to stimulate the imagination, Great Books explores what it means to be human. Through reading and discussion of the literary canon, students understand the rich heritage of Western Culture and the human conditions. This course offers the student an opportunity to read from a wide variety of canonical offerings: Shakespeare, classic American novels, myths, science fiction, the Bible, and fairy tales. The student will read Greek and Roman epics and myths, and ancient and modern works. Discussions will be conducted in a seminar fashion.

THE HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE: A SEARCH FOR CONSCIENCE H/A: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one-semester course will focus on the study of the Holocaust of World War II. The course provides a multidimensional view that seeks to examine the inhumanity of those who perpetrated it, the horror of those who endured it, the valor of those who resisted it, and the shame of those who ignored it. Students will analyze official documents, newspaper and essay accounts, literature, music, art, and cinema as expressions of both the culture of the oppressor and the culture of the oppressed, as they seek to understand why nations and individuals turn to hatred and even genocide as a way of coping with the pressures of life.

JOURNALISM 1 H/A`: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Journalism 1 H/A is an introduction to both print and online media. The course emphasizes the power of communication in writing and provides techniques and practice for writing news, features, reviews, editorials, columns, and sports articles. Students will also learn approaches to investigative reporting and will learn the code of ethics to which journalists adhere. Students will examine the role of the objective reporters as well as the role of the press in society. The following skills will also be covered: headline construction, copy editing, and caption writing. Student work will be considered for publication in the school newspaper.

JOURNALISM 2 H/A: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Journalism 1, newspaper editorial board or equivalent

In Journalism 2 H/A, students will participate in extensive studies of and experiments with the modern concepts, techniques and psychologies used in newspaper design and image preparation. Students will complete investigative reports and write in depth articles on a variety of timely issues. The course will include assignments, which require written, practical, and creative responses. Students will be encouraged to be published in the school paper.

BROADCASTING 1: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Throughout the semester, students create a variety of projects that explore basic principles of pre-production, cinematography, and editing. Areas of study may include stop motion, movie trailers, news reporting, and commercial, music video, and short film production. Students will also analyze professional work in hopes of understanding the culture and the impact of Digital Media as a mass medium.

BROADCASTING 2: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Broadcasting 1

Throughout the semester, students create a variety of projects that explore advanced principles of pre-production, cinematography, and editing. Areas of study may include the film as narrative, documentary, and literary adaptation, as well as broadcast journalism. Students may also have the freedom to explore topics of their choice. Students will also continue analyzing professional work in hopes of understanding the culture and the impact of Digital Media as a mass medium. It is strongly recommended that the student initially take Broadcasting I before enrolling in this course.

PUBLIC SPEAKING: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Public Speaking enables students of all ability levels to gain confidence and poise when speaking in both small and large group situations. The student will learn the strategies and techniques of effective speaking then practice their speaking skills in a variety of real life situations. These include, but are not limited to, interviews, acceptance speeches, presentations, impromptu situations, and persuasive speeches. Students will participate in a culminating activity by staging a formal debate based on policy format with topics related to current affairs.

WRITING WORKSHOP 1 H/A: 9, 10 (2.5 credits)

The goal of this elective is to introduce students to various genres of writing that they may not have the opportunity to explore in depth in their required English classes. Students will explore memoir, poetry, journalism, and/or other styles of writing through careful study of sample pieces. They will then engage in the writing process to create pieces that follow the characteristics of the genre. In addition, time will be spent reading and practicing a variety of essay types, including PARCC and SAT essays. At the conclusion of the course, students will work on expanding and revising one of their works through further exploration of the genre with an aim toward publication.

FILM APPRECIATION: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Film Appreciation introduces students to a variety of landmark films from different historic periods, challenging them to look beyond the contemporary and understand the heritage of cinema. Throughout the semester, students will explore several genres, gaining insight into what happens both on screen and behind the scenes. By engaging with a variety of media, students enhance their ability to both view and write critically about films. Each semester brings a different “classic playlist” as well as a spattering of modern selections. Thus, students can take the course—for credit—more than once! Whether you’re already a serious film buff or aspiring to become one, “film” is for you.

SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 9 (Full Year) (5 credits)

In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation, or PARCC 8 Language Arts. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course.

SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS 10 (Full Year) (5 credits)

In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation or PARCC 9 Language Arts score. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course.

SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS: 11 (Full Year) (5 credits)

In addition to their core content course, this course is recommended for students identified as at-promise in Language Arts due to their level of content knowledge and skills indicated by end of course grades, teacher recommendation or PARCC 10 Language Arts score. Teachers will identify individual student’s areas of weakness in Language Arts and tailor a learning program that will build skill, and strengthen self-confidence. As well, students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course. Students will receive a grade in this course.

SEMINAR ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS: 12 (Full Year) (5 credits)

In addition to their core content course, this course is required for students who have not met the required graduation assessment. This course will prepare students to successfully complete the Accuplacer, ASVAB, or portfolio assessment to meet the graduation requirement.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

CORE ELECTIVES

CULINARY ARTS I (Formerly COOKING TECHNIQUES): 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one-semester course provides the students with the opportunity to develop life skills through the exploration of culinary arts. The classwork will focus on the kitchen basics such as measuring, reading and following a recipe and using and properly caring for common tools and equipment. Units taught will include baking proteins, vegetables, fruits, dairy and grains. Students will demonstrate basic food preparation techniques in practical lab experiences and critique the finished products. While preparing foods, he students will demonstrate self-management, critical thinking and problem solving skills while practicing safety and sanitation standards. This course prepares students for life after high school.

CULINARY ARTS II (Formerly WORLD OF FOODS): 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one semester course allows students to build upon their skills learned in Culinary Arts I. By working cooperatively in a practical lab setting, students will compare cuisines, ingredients and preferred cooking methods of various cultures. The influence of traditions and regional and cultural perspectives on food choices and culinary practices will be emphasized. Students will examine the issues and conditions that affect the availability and quality of food in the global market, and apply advanced cooking techniques, including the use of specialty and advanced equipment in the preparation of food dishes.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

Preparation: Successful completion of Culinary Arts I & II

CATERING (Formerly FOOD SERVICES): 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one semester course will introduce students to the world of catering. Students will learn how to develop menus that meet the needs of different groups or clients. Attention is given to the production of each food course, such as the salad, appetizer, main course and dessert. Catering basics, such as event set up and serving styles are covered. Students will apply their skills by planning menus, preparing the food and executing events such as buffet luncheons. Before taking this course, student must have completed the Culinary I and II courses.

ADVANCED CATERING (Formerly ADVANCED FOOD SERVICE): 10, 11, 12
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Catering (2.5 credits)

This one semester course will provide practical applications of the skills learned in the Catering course. Event planning skills such as developing a menu, preparing food and event execution are emphasized. Students will learn basic food safety practices, party planning, cooking for a crowd, planning meals, dealing with customers, understanding how to price catering services, and moving the food safely from one location to another. Students will participate in several school events to implement their skills. Students will learn culinary, time management and kitchen organization skills needed to be successful in the field of culinary arts.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Our Physical Education program is designed to maximize the fitness, skill and understanding of each student through a variety of unit offerings. The curriculum seeks to develop a positive attitude toward physical activity and fitness. Students are scheduled in physical education for one semester of the school year. Adjustments to the course offerings may be made due to facilities, staff availability, and class size considerations. All units have been designed for both male and female students.

CORE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES

CO-ED PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 9 (2.5 credits)

Freshmen will have four units of physical education. Acclimation to the high school environment and exposure to a range of physical education programs is a high priority for our freshmen.

AerobicsFootballLacrosseTrack & Field
BasketballGamesPhysical FitnessVolleyball
DanceGymnasticsSoftballWeight Training

CO-ED PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

The activities will vary from unit to unit depending on the available staff and facilities. Students will have four different activity units each year of physical education from the sophomore through the senior year. The following activities will be offered:

AerobicsGolfSoccerUltimate Frisbee
ArcheryIndoor HockeySoftballVolleyball
BadmintonJoggingSpeedballWeight Training
BasketballLacrosseTable TennisWrestling
BicyclingPhysical FitnessTeam HandballStress Management
BowlingPickleballTrack & FieldCPR Certification
Field HockeySelf DefenseTouch Football
GamesSlimnasticsTumbling

The following courses are not included in the computation of weighted class rank.

Any child whose parent or guardian presents to the school principal a signed statement that any part of the instruction in family life education is in conflict with his conscience, or sincerely held moral or religious beliefs, shall be excused from that portion of the course where such instruction is being given and no penalties as to credit or graduation shall result there from." (N.J.S.A. 18:354.7)

CO-ED HEALTH: 9 (2.5 credits)

The freshman health curriculum consists of an introduction to the nature of health with concentration in the area of mental health, a review of general first aid procedures and a study of human reproduction and contraception.

CO-ED HEALTH: 10 (2.5 credits)

The sophomore health curriculum is the classroom introduction of driver education culminating with the New Jersey Drivers’ [written] examination. Ten hours of substance abuse education, five hours of AIDS education, and several lessons on sexual harassment and violence prevention are included.

CO-ED HEALTH: 11 (2.5 credits)

The junior health curriculum consists of four areas of study: drug education, fitness and nutrition, current health issues, and family life education.

CO-ED HEALTH: 12 (2.5 credits)

In this course, the student is exposed to an in-depth study of the family in American society. The student is familiarized with the many possible situations and responsibilities of today's family. The course is made more varied through the contributions of various outside speakers who help broaden the scope of the student's experience.

MIND BODY CONNECTIONS 1: 11, 12 (5 credits)

This is a full-year course designed for the serious student of “fitness”. Stress will be placed on the muscular domain. The course is offered in lieu of the required health and Physical Education. Students will design, develop and practice appropriate fitness regimens that will serve them for a lifetime of wellness. An integral part of the course will be devoted to character education as well as other relevant health education issues.

MIND BODY CONNECTIONS 2: 11, 12 (5 credits)

This is a full-year course designed for the serious student of “fitness”. Stress will be placed on total-body fitness. The course is offered in lieu of the required Health and Physical Education. Students will study body weight exercises, yoga, pilates and cardiovascular endurance. Students will design, develop and practice appropriate fitness regimens that will serve them for a lifetime of wellness. An integral part of the course will be devoted to character education as well as other relevant health education issues.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

DANCE 1 (2.5 credits)

This course is designed for those students who seriously want to pursue the study of dance. The student will pursue an understanding and appreciation of Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Multicultural, Hip-Hop, Choreography, and Fitness. The student will aspire to understand the perceptual, intellectual, physical, and technical skills needed for the creation and performance of dance.

DANCE 2 (2.5 credits)

This course will enable the student to further pursue the movement concepts related to a wide variety of dance forms. The student will focus on the technical skills needed for the creation and performance of dance, gain knowledge, understanding, and aesthetic awareness of the Performing and Visual Arts. They will compare, contrast, observe, analyze, and understand visual expression and presentation.


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

CORE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES ELECTIVES

SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST [SAT] REVIEW: 10, 11 (2.5 credits)

An intensive review course, the SAT preparation course will provide students with nine weeks of English preparation and nine weeks of mathematics. Students will learn test-taking strategies and take practice tests. In the English section of the course, students will focus on techniques for improving reading comprehension, vocabulary, and writing. In the mathematics section, students will analyze and practice sample SAT questions in algebra and geometry. Basic mathematical concepts will be reviewed. Students will be requested to take the SAT test closest to the conclusion of the course.

AP SEMINAR: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

AP RESEARCH: 11, 12 (5 Credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of AP Seminar

AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

UNIQUE ELECTIVE AT WEST

COMMUNITY SERVICE AND AWARENESS PROGRAM: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

The purpose of this course is to increase student involvement in community affairs and awareness of community service opportunities and public issues, and to give students an opportunity to reflect on their service-related experiences. Students must complete a minimum of fifty-three (53) hours of community service at a Board-approved service agency, Habitat for Humanity, nursing homes, hospitals, schools, etc. maintain a journal of service-related experiences, and attend four (4) hour-and-a-half public affairs discussions.


Mathematics

CORE MATH COURSES

The most common course sequences are indicated below.

If Intro to Functions was successfully mastered by grade 8:

Grade 9

Geometry A or Geometry H or Functions

Grade 10

Functions H or Algebra 2 A or Pre-Calculus A

Grade 11

Pre-Calculus H, Pre-Calculus A, plus AP Statistics or AP Calculus

(as an additional elective)

Grade 12

AP Calculus or Calculus A, plus AP Statistics or Multivariable Calculus

If Intro to Functions or 8th grade Algebra was not successfully completed or taken by grade 8:

A Level/ICR

Grade 9

Enriched Algebra A ICR



Grade 10

Geometry A ICR; may double up with Algebra 2A ICR



Grade 11

Algebra 2A ICR; or if students double up in 10th Grade,

Pre-Calculus A


Grade 12

Pre-Calculus A; or Calculus A if students double up in Grade 10; plus Statistics AP (as an additional elective)

R Level

Grade 9

Algebra 1 R



Grade 10

Geometry R



Grade 11

Algebra 2 R



Grade 12

Trigonometry R or Introduction to College Mathematics R or Discrete Math A

R Level/ICR

Grade 9

Algebra 1R/ICR



Grade 10

Geometry R/ICR



Grade 11

Algebra 2 R/ICR



Grade 12

Introduction to College Mathematics R or Discrete Math R

Other


Grade 9

Algebraic Concepts 1



Grade 10

Algebraic Concepts 2



Grade 11

Geometric Concepts


CORE MATH COURSES

ENRICHED ALGEBRA A: 9 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful mastery of the pre-algebra course, 8th grade Enriched Math and less than masterful completion of EAA.

Enriched Algebra A is designed for the student who has already learned some of the major concepts and processes of algebra but seeks a deeper and broader understanding of the discipline. This course integrates the advanced elements of algebra with technology, problem solving, application and mathematical modeling. As well, Enriched Algebra A is designed to further develop the student’s reasoning skills, with an emphasis on logic that is central to student achievement in upper level mathematics courses.

ENRICHED ALGEBRA A: 9/ICR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful mastery of the pre-algebra course, 8th grade Enriched Math and less than masterful completion of EAA.

Enriched Algebra A is designed for the student who has already learned some of the major concepts and processes of algebra but seeks a deeper and broader understanding of the discipline. This course integrates the advanced elements of algebra with technology, problem solving, application and mathematical modeling. As well, Enriched Algebra A is designed to further develop the student’s reasoning skills, with an emphasis on logic that is central to student achievement in upper level mathematics courses.

ALGEBRA 1 R: 9 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of 8th grade Academic Math or unsuccessful completion of 8th grade Enriched Math

A study is made of the properties of the real number system through a mathematically informal and intuitive approach. The concepts of number properties, positive and negative numbers, factoring, mathematical symbols and notation are studied. These concepts are used to perform operations with algebraic expressions. Changing words to symbols, solution of word problems, and techniques of graphing linear equations and inequalities in the Cartesian plane are included. Additional topics include the solution of systems of linear equations and simple quadratic equations with their application through math modeling and performance assessments.

ALGEBRA 1 R: 9/ICR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of 8th grade Academic Math or unsuccessful completion of 8th grade Enriched Math

A study is made of the properties of the real number system through a mathematically informal and intuitive approach. The concepts of number properties, positive and negative numbers, factoring, mathematical symbols and notation are studied. These concepts are used to perform operations with algebraic expressions. Changing words to symbols, solution of word problems, and techniques of graphing linear equations and inequalities in the Cartesian plane are included. Additional topics include the solution of systems of linear equations and simple quadratic equations with their application through math modeling and performance assessments.

ALGEBRA SEMINAR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Current enrollment in Algebra 1 or Enriched Algebra

This course is required for students “at promise” in Algebra 1 due to their level of math knowledge and skill as indicated on NJ-SLA Math assessment and/or achievement in their 8th grade math course. Teachers will identify student’s areas of weakness in algebra skills and tailor a learning program that will support the NJ Student Learning standards for Algebra 1 to build skill, strength and self-confidence. Students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course. Students will receive a grade in this course. Additionally, students not originally identified but selected by their current math teacher may rotate into and out of this course on an as-needed basis if space is available.

ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS 1 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Completion of 8th grade Academic Math

In this course, students will solidify their understanding of real numbers at a level and in a context appropriate for high school students and will be (re)introduced to algebraic concepts in a real world context. Solving linear equations, interpreting graphs, using rules of exponents, understanding polynomials and factoring are some of the major topics they will learn. Through the use of the graphing calculator, instructional technology and manipulatives, students will gain an understanding of these algebraic concepts as they develop skills that will prepare them for the Algebra 1 - End of Course Assessment. Teacher will develop instructional and assessment strategies that will best help each student meet the goals of the curriculum. This course is only available to students with IEPs.

GEOMETRY H: 9 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Mastery of Intro to Functions (8th grade)

This is a rigorous and fast-paced course available to 9th grade students who have mastered Introduction to Functions in the middle school and who wish to study geometry in-depth. In addition to all units studied in Geometry A, the curriculum will include such topics as: locus of points, coordinate proofs, vectors, coordinates in space, reflections, translations, rotations, and dilations. (These additional topics exceed the standards recommended by NCTM and the NJ Student Learning Standards). Students who master this course are expected to enroll in Functions H in the sophomore year.

GEOMETRY A/ICR: 9, 10 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Mastery of Intro to Functions (8th grade) or successful completion of Enriched Algebra A (9th grade)

A study is made of the basic structure of two and three-dimensional Euclidean geometry. Geometry is based on undefined terms (point, line, and plane), defined terms, and postulates, all of which are used to prove theorems and to solve problems deductively. Understanding of these fundamental concepts is achieved through a study of lines, segments, angles, polygons, and circles. The integration of algebra, methods of proof and fundamental concepts of mathematical logic are stressed. Additionally, the use of the instructional technology is used to reinforce concepts and develop performance assessments.

GEOMETRY R: 10 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra I R (9th Grade)

A study is made of the basic structure of two-dimensional Euclidean geometry. Geometry is based on undefined terms (point, line, and plane), defined terms, and postulates, all of which are used to prove theorems and solve problems deductively. Understanding of these and fundamental concepts is achieved through a study of lines, segments, angles, polygons, and circles. In this course, the methods of proof are generally approached through carefully selected examples. Additionally, the use of instructional technology is used to reinforce concepts and develop performance assessments.

GEOMETRY R: 10/ICR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra I R (9th Grade)

A study is made of the basic structure of two-dimensional Euclidean geometry. Geometry is based on undefined terms (point, line, and plane), defined terms, and postulates, all of which are used to prove theorems and solve problems deductively. Understanding of these fundamental concepts is achieved through a study of lines, segments, angles, polygons, and circles. In this course, the methods of proof are generally approached through carefully selected examples. Additionally, the use of instructional technology is used to reinforce concepts and develop performance assessments.

GEOMETRY SEMINAR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Current enrollment in Geometry

This course is required for students “at-promise” in Geometry due to their level of math knowledge and skill as indicated on NJ-SLA math assessment and/or achievement in their Algebra 1 course. Teachers will identify student’s areas of weakness in geometry skills and tailor a learning program that will support the NJ Student Learning standards for Geometry to build skill, strength and self-confidence. Students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course. Students will receive a grade in this course. Additionally, students not originally identified but selected by their current math teacher may rotate into and out of this course on an as-needed basis if space is available.

GEOMETRIC CONCEPTS: 11 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebraic Concepts 1 & Algebra Concepts II.

This course is designed for the student who has successfully completed Algebraic Concepts 1 and Algebra Concepts II or has demonstrated knowledge of the content and skills of the course. Students will learn the language of geometry through explorations and manipulations using technology and materials such as Geoboards. They will apply their algebra skills in the study of triangles, polygons and circles. Teacher will develop instructional and assessment strategies that will best help each student meet the goals of the curriculum. This course is only available to students with IEPs.

FUNCTIONS H: 10 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Mastery of Intro to Functions (8th Grade) and successful completion of Geometry H (9th Grade)

This is a rigorous course that serves as a precursor to Pre-Calculus H and Calculus AP. During the first marking period, students use their previously mastered algebra skills as they learn the major concepts and skills of the second year of algebra, all of which are then applied throughout the remaining three marking periods. Operations and transformations are performed on these functions to produce other more complicated functions, which are also analyzed. Probability and statistics through the study of central tendencies, is also explored. Application of concepts is reinforced through lab experiments and math modeling. Properties of functions and relations are reviewed and the study of the circular, algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions is extended.

ALGEBRA 2 A/ICR: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Enriched Algebra A and Geometry A

This course involves a continuation of the study of the properties of the real numbers begun in Enriched Algebra A. A study of quadratic functions leads to an extension of the real number system to the complex number system. The study of quadratic functions is then generalized to the study of polynomial functions of higher degree, before an analysis of radical and rational functions is undertaken. Students will then embark upon a study of exponential and logarithmic functions before ending the year with an introduction to trigonometry. All of the above concepts are reinforced through several major themes of the course: analysis of functions presented in different forms, transformations of functions, and systems of equations.

ALGEBRA 2 R/ICR: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1 R and Geometry R

This course involves a continuation of the study of the real numbers begun in Algebra 1. A study of quadratic functions leads to an extension of the real number system to the complex number system. The study of quadratic functions is then generalized to the study of polynomial functions of higher degree, before an analysis of radical and rational functions is undertaken. Students will then embark upon a study of exponential and logarithmic functions before ending the year with an introduction to trigonometry. All of the above concepts are reinforced through several major themes of the course: analysis of functions presented in different forms, transformations of functions, and systems of equations.

ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS 2 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebraic Concepts I

In this course, students will continue to develop their algebra skills begun in Algebraic Concepts 1. Through the use of graphing calculators, instructional technology and manipulatives, students will deepen and expand their algebra skills. Teacher will develop instructional and assessment strategies that will best help each student meet the goals of the curriculum and the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for Mathematics. This course is only available to students with IEPs.

ALGEBRA 2 SEMINAR (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Current Enrollment in Algebra 2

This course is required for students “at promise” in Algebra 2 due to their level of math knowledge and skill as indicated on NJ-SLA Math assessment and/or achievement in Algebra 1 and/or Geometry courses. Teachers will identify student’s areas of weakness in algebra skills and tailor a learning program that will support the common core standards for Algebra 2 to build skill, strength and self-confidence. Students will benefit from small group instruction when appropriate in this course. Additionally, students not originally identified but selected by their current math teacher may rotate into and out of this course on an as-needed basis if space is available.

PRE-CALCULUS H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Enriched Algebra A, Geometry A or H, and Functions H.

This course continues the study of the properties of selected functions using both real and complex numbers. Limits of sequences and functions are studied in detail as a preparation for the calculus. Vectors and graphs in two and three-space are analyzed. An introduction to the derivative is made as a calculus preview incorporated through the year. Application of concepts is reinforced through math modeling and performance assessments.

PRE-CALCULUS A: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Enriched Algebra A, Geometry A, and Algebra II A

This course involves a review of the properties of the real number system and some properties of the complex number system. Properties of functions and relations are reinforced and the study of the algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions is extended. Vectors are introduced. These concepts are reinforced through math modeling of real world applications, the use of technology and performance assessments.

TRIGONOMETRY R: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1 R, Geometry R, and Algebra 2 R

This course involves a review of real number systems. Properties of functions and relations are reviewed and expanded to include circular, trigonometric, algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. These concepts are reinforced through math modeling of real world applications, technology and performance assessments.

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATHEMATICS R: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 2 R or Algebra 2 R/ICS

This course involves review of algebra, geometry and extends the study of functions introduced in Algebra 1, 2, and Geometry. Other topics are sequences, series, central tendencies and probability. The use of math modeling and real-world applications are incorporated on a regular basis.

AP CALCULUS: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Geometry A or H, Functions H, and Pre-Calculus H

This course involves a comprehensive study of differential and integral calculus. The concepts of limits and continuity are analyzed as the basis for the study of the calculus. A balance is maintained between theory, applications, and manipulative techniques. Included are the concepts of differentiation of elementary and transcendental functions, differentials, and the definite integral, techniques of integration, series and differential equations. The BC syllabus of the Advanced Placement Examination is satisfied and students are expected to take the AP exam.

CALCULUS A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Enriched Algebra A, Geometry A, Algebra 2A, and PreCalculus A

A brief review of algebra is followed by an intuitive approach to the concept of a limit. Also included in the study are the concepts of continuity, differentiation of elementary and transcendental functions, differentials, definite integral, and techniques of integration. Applications of both the integral and derivative are stressed. [The AB syllabus of the Advanced Placement Examination is satisfied.] Additionally, application of calculus concepts is applied to the real world through performance assessments.

CORE MATH ELECTIVES

DISCRETE MATH/PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 2

This course is designed as a full year elective for senior students desiring an additional year of mathematics outside the traditional course sequence. Topics covered will include election theory, weighted voting, fair division algorithms, graph theory, optimal scheduling, fractals, and Fibonacci growth. Additionally, a large portion of the second semester is devoted to the study of statistics with a review of probability. The course is focused on building a direct and immediate connection between the mathematics of our world and the concrete, real-life problems in which mathematics is realized.

AP STATISTICS: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Functions H, Algebra 2A, Pre-Calculus H or Pre-Calculus

This course provides a pervasive study of the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data, Sampling and Experimentation, Anticipating Patterns, and Statistical Inference. Students will apply knowledge of numerical and graphical summaries of data, least-squares regression and logarithms, and probability and simulation to solve problems. In addition, students will perform a variety of significant tests in order to evaluate hypotheses. These tests include sample means, sample proportions, chi-square, and inference for regression.

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS H: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Calculus AP (11th grade)

This course is designed to extend the fundamental concepts of calculus from the two-dimensional setting to those in three dimensions. Students begin the year with a review and extension of their knowledge of parametric and polar curves before embarking upon the calculus of vector-valued functions. The notion of a function of a single real variable is generalized to that of a function of several variables, allowing the generalization of the ideas of limits and continuity, the derivative and the integral. The limit definition of the partial derivative is introduced as a parallel to that of the ordinary derivative, and once computational fluency is achieved, applications such as optimization problems and Lagrange Multipliers are explored. The central theme of the integral is generalized to that of the multiple integral, as several coordinate systems are explored in detail, including the polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems as aids to such integration.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

This course is an introductory course designed to develop an understanding of how computers process information. Students learn organizational, analytical and problem solving skills while implementing structured programming techniques. This course introduces concepts central to computer science including data structures, object-oriented programming, top-down design, algorithms and event driven programming. This is accomplished by an examination and implementation of code that forms the basis of most software applications used on the internet. A high-level drag-and-drop language will be utilized.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (AP CSP): 9,10,11,12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) examination and is equivalent to a first-semester college-level course. This course introduces high school students to the foundations of modern computing. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics, such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. This additional AP Computer course will aid our students in pursuing Computer Science & Technology related majors in college and as a career.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A: 10,11,12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of an Algebra 1 course and Introduction to Programming

This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science “A” examination and is equivalent to a first-semester college-level course. It is an ambitious course that will expose students to concepts central to modern object oriented programming and computer science including problem solving, design strategies, and analysis of potential solutions. The central focus of this course is on object oriented and modular design, control structures, Boolean logic, input/output, recursive methods, and searching and sorting algorithms. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. All programming assignments are implemented in the Java programming language.

Science

CORE SCIENCE COURSES

BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY HONORS H: 9 (6 credits)

Biology is a REQUIRED science course for all students to fulfil the state graduation requirement. This is a lab-based course which engages students in scientific and engineering practices with the goal of increasing student understanding of life science. Study of topics covered in genetics, natural selection, ecosystems and the environment will be covered. In addition, students in Biology Honors will study more advanced topics in molecular biology. Students enrolled in Biology Honors will engage in lab activities that require collaboration with peers as well as application of science concepts learned in order to solve problems.

BIOLOGY A/ICR: 9 (6 credits)

Biology is a REQUIRED science course for all students as part of the state of New Jersey graduation requirement. Biology is a lab-based course which engages students in scientific and engineering practices with the goal of increasing student understanding of life science. Study of topics such as cell biology, the flow of energy within and between organisms, genetics, natural selection, ecosystems and the environment. Students enrolled in Biology will engage in lab activities that require collaboration with peers as well as application of science concepts learned in order to solve problems and create models.

BIOLOGY CONCEPTS: 9 (5 credits)

Biology is a REQUIRED science course for all students as part of the state of New Jersey graduation requirement. Biology Concepts presents an alternative approach to the study of biology specifically for special education students. The students will experience the biology curriculum with a small class size allowing for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

AP BIOLOGY: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology 1 A or H, and Chemistry 1 A or H

AP Biology is a first year college-level course for students of high academic ability who may plan to major in biology or prepare for one of the health related fields (medicine, dentistry and nursing). Topic areas include cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, oxidation/reduction reactions acid/base balance, organismal reproduction, development, growth and nutrition, ecology, heredity, genetic engineering, evolution, organismal biology (structure and function), systematics, and behavior. Students taking this course should be prepared to put forth the time and effort required for a college science course. A great deal of reading will be required. There is a summer reading requirement. Students may be eligible for college credit from Camden County College. See your school guidance counselor for more information.

CHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY H: 10 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

Chemistry H is an honors-level introductory chemistry course designed for those students who have displayed exceptional interest and aptitude in their previous science studies. This course is recommended for those students who intend to major in science and technical fields at the college level. The student should display a high degree of mathematical competency and superior problem solving abilities. The design of Chemistry H will permit the student to study a larger number of concepts in greater depth than is possible in the A level course. This course will incorporate units on atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base theory, and electrochemistry. This course will prepare students to take the SAT II Chemistry test and the AP Chemistry course.

CHEMISTRY A/ICR: 10 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

Chemistry A is a full-year, six-credit introductory lab-based chemistry course. This course emphasizes discussions, activities, and laboratory exercises, which promote the understanding of the behavior of matter at the macroscopic, molecular and atomic levels. Chemical principles are introduced so that students will be able to explain the composition and chemical behavior of their world.

CHEMISTRY CONCEPTS: 10 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology Concepts

Chemistry Concepts presents an alternative approach to the study of Chemistry specifically for special education students. The students will experience the chemistry curriculum with a small class size allowing for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

AP CHEMISTRY: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 2A, Chemistry 1A or 1H

AP Chemistry is a college-level course, using first-year college texts and laboratory experiments. It is designed to give the science major a more extensive chemical background than is possible from Chemistry 1A or 1H alone. The course content will draw upon the student's knowledge of first year chemistry. In addition, new concepts will be covered such as acid base and solution equilibrium, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, oxidation reduction and organic chemistry. AP Chemistry is designed such that a student who is interested in science as a career may receive advanced placement at the college level upon successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examination, and the instructor's recommendation. Because of the subject matter included in the course, it is expected that the student will exhibit a proficiency level higher than that required for Chemistry 1A and 1H.

PHYSICS

PHYSICS 1 A/ICR: 11 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

Physics 1A is a full year six-credit introductory lab-based physics course. The core of the program consists of kinematics, vectors, Newton's Laws of Motion, universal gravitation, oscillatory motion, the laws of conservation of energy and momentum, geometrical and physical optics, scientific models, Coulomb's Law, and simple circuits. The course attempts to develop critical thinking to enable the student to reach a true understanding of science, rather than accumulate a mass of facts; as well, it strives to acquaint the student with the power and limitations of science.

PHYSICS CONCEPTS: 11 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Algebra 1

Physics Concepts presents an alternative approach to the study of Physics specifically for special education students. The students will experience the physics curriculum with a small class size allowing for differentiated instruction and one-on-one supports.

AP PHYSICS 1: 10,11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Completion of Geometry

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics, designed for students who have displayed exceptional interest and aptitude in their science to develop deep understanding of physics and apply their knowledge and skills through inquiry labs. This course fits the needs of students who plan to go college with a major in science, engineering or medicine. Topics covered will include Kinematics, Newton's Laws of Motion, Gravitation, Energy, Momentum, Conservation Laws, Rotation, Oscillations, Wave Motion, Electrostatics, Current Electricity, and Optics.

AP PHYSICS C: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of AP Physics; taking Calculus H or A currently

AP Physics C is a college level course, which strives to enhance the scientific maturity of the student through a vigorous emphasis on the fundamentals of physics. The core of the program consists of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism, and parallels the Advanced Placement C Level curriculum. Other topics to be covered at the option of the instructor, and as time permits, shall include waves, thermodynamics, special relativity, and quantum theory.

CORE SCIENCE ELECTIVES

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: 11,12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry

The AP Environmental Science course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE A/ ICR: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology

Environmental Science is the study of how humans affect their environment. It addresses the interrelationships between the living and nonliving components of an ecosystem as well as the social, economic, political and ethical issues associated with our major environmental concerns. Some topics of study will include principles of ecology, population dynamics, energy, major environmental concerns, toxicology, risk management, wildlife conservation, economics and politics of the environment, with sustainability being a common thread throughout all units. This course is both laboratory and field-oriented. Environmental Science is designed to provide students with information to help them make reasonable decisions regarding their actions on the environment.

BIOLOGY 2 A: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology 1 A

Biology 2 A is a full year course that builds on existing content knowledge from Biology 1. New content is also introduced that is not included in a first-year biology curriculum. Topics include evolution, microbiology, applied genetics, botany, zoology, biotechnology and molecular genetics, and bioethics. Students are expected to conduct independent laboratory research for many of the topics throughout the year. The course is designed to sharpen laboratory skills and to expose students to new content, laboratory techniques and equipment.

FORENSIC SCIENCE H/A: 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION:Successful completion of Biology & Chemistry

This course is a standards-based introduction to the topics of Criminology within the field of forensic science. Forensic Science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by agencies in the criminal justice system. It applies the knowledge and technology of science for the definition and enforcement of such laws. Students will be required to apply principles and techniques from the areas of chemistry, physics, biology, and geology to analyze the many different types of physical evidence that may be recovered during a criminal investigation. Students are required to prepare formal criminal investigation reports and give oral reports on their findings. They will also be required to participate in mock courtroom trials where they must present their scientific evidence in a clear and informed manner to a “jury” and/or “judge”. Topics covered include: History of Forensics, The Crime Lab, Glass, Fingerprinting, Hairs, Fibers, Paint, Document Examination, Blood, Blood Splatter Analysis, DNA Analysis, Drugs & Alcohol, Footprints, and Forensic Anthropology. The course culminates with students investigating an actual crime scene, applying the techniques and skills acquired throughout the course. Students should be aware of the nature of the course content before choosing to enroll.

PLANETARY EXPLORATION A: 11, 12 (6 credits)

This program will address the following essential questions: What physical and chemical systems do the planets of our solar system have? How do the solar system and galaxies evolve? What is the origin of universe? By exploring these essential questions, students will apply the fundamental concepts of earth science, biology, chemistry, physics and technology. In their investigation of the earth, our solar system, Milky Way galaxies and the universe, they will examine real time view of various images of planets through the Internet and get connected with the various government agencies, such as JPL, NASA, NOAA. This program is a technology-rich, integrated program designed to meet the needs of students who are non-science majors. Its purpose is to help students (1) realize the important role that science will play in their personal and professional lives, (2) use principles of science to think more intelligently about the universe they live in and about the current issues of science and technology, and (3) develop a lifelong awareness of the potential and limitations of science and technology.

VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY H/A: 10, 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology 1H or A

This course is designed for students interested in careers in the health field and concentrates on vertebrate anatomy and physiology. It uses dissection of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. It shows the interrelationship between these vertebrates using an evolutionary approach. Comparison is made to the human structures, especially with mammals using cat dissection. Clinical application of content material is accomplished in the form of case studies and computer simulation. The student will become proficient in dissection and the use of the microscope in order to identify human cells and tissues. Note: Dissection is large portion of the curriculum, and students enrolled in this course must be willing to be active participants in the dissections.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY H/A: 10, 11, 12 (6 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Biology 1A or 1H

This course is an in-depth study of human anatomy and physiology and is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in medicine, nursing, physical therapy or other health-care fields. In this laboratory-oriented course involving the detailed study of the structure and function of human body systems, students will have the opportunity to explore organ physiology as well as its intricate structure. In addition, students will relate the physiology they study to the real-world case studies. Unique components of the honors level course such as student participation in the study of human dissection at the cadaver lab of the Rutgers School of Biomedical and Health Sciences are sought. Also, the “Shadow a Medical Student” program is intended for all interested students, allowing them to gain insight into the medical school experience.

DYNAMICS OF HEALTH CARE & SOCIETY: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Health Science Careers Program Pre-Co Requisites: Algebra, Biology, Chemistry
students must arrange and complete 10 volunteer clinical/observation hours in a healthcare facility

In this course, students will learn about the environment and components of the health care field of employment. Topics will include ethics, professional behavior, decision making, problem solving, management, infection control, safety on the job, health careers, stress, time management skills, the history of healthcare, communication, getting a job and job satisfaction. Students will participate in varied activities and projects to help understand and implement the importance of teamwork and interpersonal relations throughout their careers. This course will serve as a foundation for the students in exploring the fundamentals of healthcare in today’s society. Students may be able to earn credit through Rutgers University by completing two courses in the Rutgers School of Health Related Professions program and by taking an end-of- course exam. Dynamics of Health Care would satisfy the first requirement for this program. This elective course does not contain a lab component and cannot be used to fulfill state lab science graduation requirements.

SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful high school completion of Dynamics of Healthcare & Society

Scientific Principles of Nutrition outlines the relationship of diet, lifestyle, and the prevention of disease. An overview of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins, and minerals is provided. Nutrition needs at various stages of the lifespan are stressed. Applying the science of nutrition to your life including needs for fitness and physical activity, evaluating nutritional claims, food labeling, and other consumer concerns are emphasized. Upon successful completion of the course with a final high school grade of a “C” or above the student will be eligible to take the Rutgers, School of Health Related Professions Health Science Careers standardized exam to determine college credit. A grade of a C (74) or better on the Scientific Principles of Nutrition standardized exam must be attained to earn college credits. If a student does not achieve college level work, the high school lists the program and no university credit is received.

RESEARCH IN SCIENCE: H/A 9, 10, 11, 12 (1-5 credits)

The ability to conduct scientific research is crucial to the future success of our students. Research in Science (RIS) is a single or multi-year (preferred) course designed to engage students in scientific research in one of the disciplines of science, such as, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Technology, Astronomy, Geology, Medicine, Engineering, Computer Science, or Mathematics. The course is the foundation for the department’s efforts to motivate students to engage in scientific research in their area of interest and to apply knowledge in a practical and real situation. Students begin with a topic search, review the scientific literature in academic journals, conduct their experimental research project, document their research and enter a science fair, exhibit or contest.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

In-Class Resource Class refers to a regular education placement with support from a special education teacher (content area teacher and special education teacher). These classes are co-taught. The frequency of inclusion varies by subject.

Concepts Class/Resource Center refers to a pull-out instruction model intended for students with academic delays and/or individual needs that may require more structure, slower pace, or additional review in a classroom. These classes are only open to students with IEPs.

  • Concepts delivery is with a special education teacher.
  • Resource center delivery is with a special education teacher. Our Study Skills class and Reading classes are examples.

Vocational and Functional Class refers to a pull-out instruction model intended for students with significant academic delays or individual needs. Functional living skills are emphasized in all classes. These classes are only open to students with IEPs.

Offerings:


Vocational EnglishCareers
ReadingVocational Math
Science/Social StudiesLiving Skills
Supermarketing/(Shop West Program)(Office Procedures)

VOCATIONAL COURSES (WEST ONLY)

VOCATIONAL ENGLISH (5 credits)

This is designed for the student who will enter the workforce upon completion of high school. This course focuses on communication skills needed to become a productive participant in society. Students will build vocabulary, critical thinking, and writing, speaking and listening skills.

VOCATIONAL READING (5 credits)

This course focuses on reading skills needed to become a productive participant in society. Students will connect reading to their everyday lives and needs to gain successful employment and independent living. Students will build skills needed to function safely in daily activities. Areas of focus include building the vocabulary needed to: communicate needs and ask for assistance both in the community and workplace, recognize and understand community and survival signs, using menus, and basic banking forms.

VOCATIONAL MATH (5 credits)

This is a multidisciplinary course which provides students continuing opportunities to develop the vocational skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, and (5) mathematical computation, that are essential for high school coursework achievement. Students will understand that when they leave school that mathematics is more important than ever. They are more and more likely to use math in their work and everyday lives.

VOCATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE (5 credits)

The students will be exposed to current events which will provide opportunities to apply strategies of investigation and inquiry to the study of present day issues. The students will be able to identify and describe all calendar holidays and their importance. The students will explore and understand weather conditions and appropriate dressing Students will gain understanding of the relationship of good nutrition to prevention control or cure of diseases and medical conditions that shorten life or lessen quality of life.

FUNCTIONAL COURSES

FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH (5 credits)

This class provides students an opportunity to develop basic skills in 1) reading, 2) writing, 3) speaking and 4) listening and study organizational skills. Students will connect both reading and writing to their everyday lives and needs to gain successful employment.

FUNCTIONAL READING (5 credits)

Students will express themselves accurately and clearly using both written and verbal forms of communication. The students will work independently and cooperatively. Focus will concentrate on sight word recognition, basic fluency, and comprehension using a variety of literature. Life skills such as high-frequency word recognition, reading a newspaper, completing job applications (paper and online), writing letters and emails and completing basic job-related reading and writing tasks will be included. Independent Reading is expected to be completed weekly as well as completing a project-based learning experience each marking period. Students will be assessed using reading inventories, reading comprehension probes and through the writing.

FUNCTIONAL MATH (5 credits)

This is a multidisciplinary course which provides students continuing opportunities to develop the functional skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills that are essential for high school course work achievement. They will calculate weekly, monthly, yearly wages, interpret an earnings statement and compute regular pay and overtime. Students will understand that when they leave school that mathematics is more important than ever.

FUNCTIONAL HISTORY (5 credits)

This is designed for student who will enter the workplace upon completion of high school. Students will acquire a basic understanding of geography, history, political history, US Constitution, environmental issues, and map reading skills.

FUNCTIONAL SCIENCE (5 credits)

This class provides students with opportunities to explore and develop inquiry methodologies related to the science fields. Students will develop skills in measurement, investigative techniques, and develop an understanding of the scientific method using hands on activities.

SELF-CONTAINED ELECTIVES
(WEST ONLY)

CAREERS (5 credits)

Students will explore career clusters, research labor market, and begin the employment process through job searching, applications, resumes, interviews, employee evaluations and job-survival skills. (1) Research job clusters; (2) Plan a career path; (3) Find job opportunities; (4) Complete job applications and resumes. (5) Prepare and participate in interviews.

OFFICE PROCEDURES (5 credits)

This course is a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, communications and organizing information. No computer experience is necessary. This course focuses on the operation of an office. The students will be exposed to keyboarding and Microsoft Office software (Word, Powerpoint, Publisher), Internet access, proofreading, effective listening, positive working relationships, demonstration of ethical work habits, and work on various office equipment. In addition to learning the technical and fundamentals of computer use, the students will build their skills in researching information, making appropriate ethical choices about the use of computers, and using technology to help you learn on your own. As appropriate, students will explore more advanced topics in computer technology, research and teamwork in creating projects requiring student design, and research.

SUPERMARKETING (ShopWest) (5 credits)

This course is designed for students to develop career planning and workplace readiness skills. A school-based learning (mini-supermarket) exposes students to occupational skills that may lead to potential independent employment after school. The student is directed and taught in the areas of safety, product ordering, telephone skills, stocking, value, money management and cash register skills. The ongoing development of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making techniques, positive self-esteem and good grooming skills is an essential aspect of the program.

SUPERMARKETING COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (5 credits)

The IEP-driven course is a unique educational strategy that combines on the job working and learning experiences with related classroom instruction in a career field directly related to a student's transition goals and objectives. The fundamental purpose of cooperative education is to provide students with opportunities to learn under realwork conditions. The cooperative education component is based on three facet plan. The first phase, the student is primarily in the school building working with a job coach in the mini supermarket exposing and introducing the aspects of operating a small business and employment skills. The second phase consists of introducing the student to travel training and job placement in the workforce (if job sites are available) for one to two days a week with a job coach. The third phase the student is travel trained and placed in the workforce (if job sites are available) for three to five days a week with a job coach until the student masters; the necessary skills to be successful.

ADAPTIVE PE: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Each activity is adapted to meet the needs of each individual student.
Physical Education is a required course necessary for graduation. Each school year, students are scheduled for three marking periods of physical education (3.75 credits) and one marking period of health education (1.25 credits). The ninth grade required program of activities includes: gymnastics speedball/ultimate Frisbee, flag football, volleyball, floor hockey, weight training/dance, track and field, fitness testing, field hockey/softball, and lacrosse. The tenth grade required program of activities includes: soccer, team handball, basketball, CPR, weight training, indoor racket sports, golf, softball/fitness testing, and tennis. Each eleventh and twelfth grade student will select activity packets. Activities within the packets include: archery, aerobics, badminton, basketball, bowling, field hockey flag football, floor hockey, games, golf, indoor soccer, jogging, kickball, lacrosse pickleball, power walking, self defense, slimnastics, softball, team handball, table tennis, tennis, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, weight training, and yoga. All juniors and seniors will participate in the Presidential Fitness Test.

READING 1 DECODING/ENCODING, FLUENCY AND COMPREHENSION
PREPARATION: CST placement

This course is designed for students that need to strengthen basic reading skills because of difficulties with phonemic awareness, single word decoding, spelling, writing, and literal comprehension. Focus will be in those areas with a structured, sequential approach to each of the skill areas. Students will be exposed to a variety of vocabulary, literature and authors. Students will learn how to answer and write a response to literature. In addition, students will be given guidance and opportunities to navigate the library and online resources to support their academic success. Students will be assessed using decoding and fluency probes and reading comprehension probes.

READING 2
PREPARATION: CST placement

This course is designed for students who are learning to apply higher order comprehension strategies to text, expand creativity and depth to well-written paragraphs and essays and who are learning to apply advanced spelling rules. Students will be exposed to a variety of literature and genres, both fiction and nonfiction. Students will expand on their ability to write a response to literature. Students will be given additional opportunities to navigate the library and online resources to support their academic success. Students will be assessed using reading comprehension probes and through writing.

STUDY SKILLS (East & West) (5 credits)

The main objective in this course is to provide a structured setting in which students can work on organization, academic performance, and self-advocacy. The following topics will be covered this year in the Study Skills course:

  1. Understanding the IEP – Explain the purpose of the document to promote
    self-advocacy
  2. Learning Styles
  3. Organization Skills – Strategies
  4. Time Management Strategies
  5. Note-Taking Skills
  6. Following Directions
  7. Listening Skills and Strategies
  8. Memory Devices
  9. Test Taking Skills

TRANSITIONAL MATH: (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Either resource replacement classes and general level Algebra and Geometry

This course has two purposes: Students will focus on basic math skills in preparation for the college placement exam. The following topics will be reviewed throughout the year: Basic Skills, Pre-Algebra, Algebra and Geometry. Students will also be taught life skills such as budgeting, banking, interviewing and a variety of other real life math skills needed to live and function independently. Students will be challenged with higher level thinking skills and use technology in the classroom. After completing this course, students should be confident when taking the Accuplacer or other college placement exam without a calculator and should be able to apply their practical money skills to real-life situations.


SOCIAL STUDIES

CORE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS H: 9 (5 credits)

This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400. The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century. Required readings include primary source documents and literature. This course is designed for students with excellent reading, writing, and oral communication skills.

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS A: 9 (5 credits)

This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400. The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century. Required readings include a variety of primary source documents. This course is designed for students with above average reading, writing, and oral communication skills.

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS A/ICR: 9 (5 credits)

This course examines the cultural and historical developments in the world since 1400. The thematically oriented course includes the study of the impact of religion and trade on society and government; political, social, and economic revolution; war and genocide; nationalism, communism, and global interdependence in the 21st century. Required readings include a variety of primary source documents. This course is designed for students with above average reading, writing, and oral communication skills. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP.

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS CONCEPTS: 9 (5 credits)

The course is a survey of the development of major civilizations within Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East from 1400-present. The curriculum is designed to emphasize the development of various skills. These skills include: writing and revision, note-taking, content reading, main idea, technology, oral presentations, map interpretations, vocabulary, organization, cooperative learning, critical thinking and problem solving, and current events. Using a thematic approach, the course will explore various topics concerning diverse peoples of the world including gender and minority issues, economic systems, technological advancements, conflict resolutions, art, literature, music, and religious and philosophical traditions. This course is only available to students with IEPs.

UNITED STATES HISTORY I

AP US HISTORY I: 10, 11 (5 credits)

This class, the first in a two-year sequence, is one of the most challenging courses offered by the Social Studies Department. It provides a study of historical events, concepts, interpretations, and themes within a framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1877. It is designed for highly motivated students with excellent proficiency in reading and well-developed analytic writing skills. The rigors of the course include complex primary source readings, AP-styled assessments including multiple choice, free response and document based questions, and command of a college-level textbook. Students will be asked to respond to sophisticated questions about the past, relate these questions to the present, identify new questions, and pursue individual topics of interest. In addition, these students should be prepared to analyze multiple interpretations of the past and develop new interpretations that respond to the needs of the present. Participants in this course are expected to prepare for and take the AP US History Exam at the end of US History II AP.

US HISTORY I A: 10 (5 credits)

This course allows students to examine historical events, concepts and themes within the framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1877. It is designed for students who have above average proficiency in reading, well-developed writing and oral communications skills, and an interest in history. In addition, students will be required to analyze multiple interpretations of American History and explain why these interpretations emerged when they did.

US HISTORY I A/ICR: 10 (5 credits)

This course allows students to examine historical events, concepts and themes within the framework of a US history survey course from colonial times to 1877. It is designed for students who have above average proficiency in reading, well-developed writing and oral communications skills, and an interest in history. In addition, students will be required to analyze multiple interpretations of American History and explain why these interpretations emerged when they did. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP.

US HISTORY I CONCEPTS: 10 (5 credits)

This is a full year survey course in American History from colonial times to 1877. The program emphasizes selected events, people and themes from the American past, but, at the same time, it provides a broad overview of American history. This course is not theoretical in nature; rather it emphasizes practical knowledge and practical skills. It is especially designed for Social Studies students who need concentrated instruction and practice to improve their reading, writing, and oral communications skills in a historical context. This course is only available to students with IEPs.

UNITED STATES HISTORY II

AP US HISTORY II : 11 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of US History I

This course is a continuation of the US HISTORY I AP program, one of the most challenging courses offered by the Social Studies Department. In this course, highly motivated students pursue a rigorous college level survey of historical events, concepts, interpretations, and themes in American History from 1877 to the present. This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American history and government. Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student-centered activities including debates and role-playing exercises. Participants in this course are expected to prepare for and take the AP US History Exam at the end of the year.

US HISTORY II A: 11 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of US History I

In this course, students will continue the survey of American History begun in US History I (studying 20th century to the present day). Following the pattern set in US History I A, students will examine the historical events, concepts, and themes that shaped the Twentieth Century, and discuss and evaluate differing interpretations provided by historians. This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American History and government. Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities including debates, role-playing exercises and independently researched presentations and projects.

US HISTORY II A/ICR: 11 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of US History I

In this course, students will continue the survey of American History begun in US History I (studying 20th century to the present day). Following the pattern set in US History I A, students will examine the historical events, concepts, and themes that shaped the Twentieth Century, and discuss and evaluate differing interpretations provided by historians. This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in American History and government. Students must be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities including debates, role-playing exercises and independently researched presentations and projects. This course is co-taught and is available for students with an IEP.

US HISTORY II CONCEPTS: 11 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of World Civilization Concepts and US History 1 Concepts or CST Placement

This is a full year survey course in American History from 1877 to Present times. The program emphasizes selected events, people and themes from the American past, but, at the same time, it provides a broad overview of American History. This course is not theoretical in nature; rather, it emphasizes practical knowledge and practical skills. It is especially designed for Social Studies students who need concentrated instruction and practice to improve their reading, writing, and oral communications skills in a historical context. This course is only open to students with IEPs.

CORE SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

AP ECONOMICS: MICROECONOMICS AND MACROECONOMICS: 11, 12 (5 credits)

The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The purpose of an AP course in Macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth and international economics. This course is designed for students who are excellent readers, have well-developed skills in research, written and oral communications, an awareness of current events, and a particular interest in the social sciences.

AP PSYCHOLOGY: 11, 12 (5 credits)

This course is a challenging one-year study of psychology. It is designed for the highly mature and motivated academic student who is interested in a systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Students will be exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields of psychology. Topics of study include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, personality, abnormal behavior and its treatment, and social psychology. In addition, students will learn about practice and critically evaluate research methods used by psychologists. The expression and preparation for the recommended Advanced Placement examination in Psychology will be emphasized.

PSYCHOLOGY A: 11, 12 (5 credits)

This advanced level course is designed for the college-bound student who is interested in studying psychology. Topics under study include motivation and emotions, sensation and perception, learning, states of consciousness, personality development, and abnormal behavior. Students will also learn about and practice experiments, surveys, and case studies as they are used by psychologists to understand human behavior and mental processes. Students are expected to have advanced reading and writing skills and a willingness to participate in classroom demonstrations, suggestions, role-playing simulations, and to perform outside reading and research. This course prepares the student for college psychology as well as addressing issues relevant to one’s personal life experiences and future careers.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY: 11, 12 (5 credits)

AP European History is designed for the highly motivated student who is interested in pursuing an intensive overview of the people, places, and events encompassing European history from 1350 to the present and offers the opportunity to receive dual credit hours through Camden County College. The course is taught at the college level. It deals with events, interpretations and themes in the context of Europe and traces the global impact of these events. The students will be required to respond to complex questions of the past, identify new questions, and pursue individual topics of interest. The students will also be asked to read various historical interpretations of the past as well as primary and secondary sources written at various times and in various European countries. They should be willing to participate in a variety of student centered activities and take the advanced placement examination in May.

AP WORLD HISTORY- MODERN: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. Focused primarily on the past thousand years of the global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional and technological precedents that along with geography, set the human stage beginning in 1200 CE Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms the organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity from this point to the present. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT & POLITICS: 11, 12 (5 credits)

The AP course in U.S. Government will give students an analytical perspective on government in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and the analysis of specific examples. It requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government. The students will become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. This course is designed for students with excellent reading comprehension, analytical writing and oral communication skills.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES H/A: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

The African-American Studies course will trace African-American history and culture from West African roots to 21st century developments. As students study the struggles and triumphs of people of West-African descent in the Americas, students will consider their efforts to forge an identity within the American mainstream. In particular, students will study the contributions of African-Americans to American civilization in science, the arts, and humanities fields. Within a historical context, students will analyze historical sources and sample the rich literature written by African-Americans. They will experience the art and music of African-American artists, composers and musicians. Topics will include: West African Empires, the slave trade and slavery, fighting back: resistance to slavery, the great migration northward, ideological approaches to African-American issues, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights movement and twenty-first century issues. Students in the African-American Studies course will analyze and discuss historical and literary sources. In addition to writing analytical and creative papers, they will engage in debates and other forms of performance assessments. Students who select Honors level will also complete an independent study project.

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1945 TO PRESENT: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

The purpose of this course is to focus on the major political, social, cultural and economic events, which have shaped the nation since the conclusion of World War II. It is an area of American history filled with monumental issues, which impacted on the American people at the apex of their power in the “American Century.” This elective is charged with a built in motivation that it studies a time most recent to the student. Strong analytical skills and the motivation to be critical are necessary for the course.

RESEARCH IN HUMANITIES H: 11, 12 (1-5 credits)

Research in Humanities is a course designed for students who are in interested in research. It is designed to allow students the unique opportunity to continue exploring the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, while also doing hands-on research that will contribute to the larger scientific research community. As part of the course, students will learn about, practice, and evaluate research methods used by psychologists. Students will conduct their own research based on their knowledge and understanding of research methodology. This course will require critical thinking skills, initiative, responsibility, leadership, and strong written and oral expression.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT EAST

AMERICAN LAW: THEORY AND PRACTICE A: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course was first designed for students who were leaning towards a career in the legal field, but it now offers much more to a wide variety of students. It provides practical information and problem solving opportunities that may develop knowledge and skills needed to survive in our law based society. Every purchase, lease, contract, marriage and divorce, and every crime places the citizen face to face with the law. This course will help students understand their legal rights and responsibilities, and will provide experience with everyday legal problems and the ability to deal with such situations. Active student involvement is the key to the course, and case studies, role playing problems, mock trials, and other activities provide an assortment of materials and approaches that will appeal to a variety of students.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

THE AMERICAN LEGAL SYSTEM: CRIMES, COURTS,
AND TORTS: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

The foremost goal of the American early leaders was to create a government of laws not of men. The American Legal System introduces students to the national and local laws and legal institutions that will affect every aspect of their lives as Americans. Designed for the active participant, the course requires students to role play and participate in mock trials. Each student must learn to “think like a lawyer.” Faced with hypothetical scenarios in constitutional, tort, and criminal law, students must identify legal issues and advocate the position of their clients. The Art of Trial Advocacy will be the focus of the culminating project. Students will learn the strategies for delivering an opening statement, questioning witnesses during direct and cross-examination, introducing physical evidence, and delivering a closing argument while prosecuting or defending a hypothetical murder case. Strong analytical skills and the motivation to be critical are necessary for the course.

POLITICS OF HATRED: RACISM IN AMERICA: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course is a semester long study of intolerance and discrimination in the United States. Students will examine the persistence of racial, religious, and ethnic prejudices that exist in today's society. This course is designed to stimulate and motivate students to work actively to improve intergroup relationships in American society. Students should come away from this course with the understanding, ability and commitment to help improve intergroup understanding. Some of the strategies used in this course will include research projects, related media, roleplaying, mock trials, and other simulations. This course recognizes the diversity of the students who may select it. While many may continue their educations on a college level, some may not. This program addresses the needs of both groups by emphasizing the academic skills and the practical and problem solving opportunities necessary to enter college or the workplace.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies electives in history, economics, psychology, and humanities provide a broad understanding of the development of human societies. They prepare students for careers in a global society by explaining how the past has shaped current political and economic systems and conflicts. By teaching the research methods of the social sciences, they prepare students for advanced study and research in history, economics and business, and psychology. All elective courses in the social sciences and humanities emphasize communication skills, including writing and public speaking. Most importantly, they teach critical thinking and decision making.

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

CORE ELECTIVES

COMPUTER GRAPHICS: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This project-based course is designed for students interested in working with 2D and 3D graphics creation software used for graphic arts, 3D modeling, and animation. This course is intended for students interested in fields requiring design visualization such as industrial design, interior design, architectural design, engineering, animation, and game creation.

ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Computer Graphics

This project-based course is a continuation of the Computer Graphics course and is designed for students interested in fields requiring design visualization such as industrial design, interior design, architectural design, engineering, animation, and game creation. Students will further their work with 2D and 3D design software with emphasis placed on animation and real-time interactive design.

ADVANCED APPLICATIONS IN COMPUTER GRAPHICS: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Advanced Computer Graphics

This project-based course will provide the student with an opportunity to develop skills with digital media while working from multi open-ended design briefs. This course is structured as an independent study course allowing a student’s individual interests to bear upon the completion of comprehensive projects.

APPLIED TECHNOLOGY: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

The Applied Technology program is designed for students to be introduced to problem solving and critical thinking using computers, tools, and equipment, employing design fabricating industrial materials. Students explore the application of technology in the areas of Industrial Material Fabrication, Design, and Communications. It includes hands-on technology learning activities that integrate technical and academic skills. Students apply knowledge from all content areas, transforming finite theories and concepts into intangible concrete prototypes. Students analyze and evaluate the development of each project.

DESIGN 1: (FORMERLY SUSTAINABLE DESIGN 1) 9, 10
AN INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY AND DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS: (5 credits)

Sustainable Design 1 is project-based, design-based course that focuses on the realm of design—requiring the thought and application of art, science and technology. An emphasis is placed on developing spatial and visualization skills, and communicating concepts through drawings and models. Descriptive geometry, orthographic drawing, and computer modeling are used to explore the interrelationships of space, structure and visual composition. Cultural and environmental sustainability and regeneration form the foundation upon which design occurs. Students investigate and integrate emerging sustainable and regenerative (“green”) methods and technology. Students gain an understanding of the relationships between what we build and its impact upon the natural world and human communities. Because design is inherently trans-disciplinary this course integrates mathematics, art, natural science, social science, business, and language arts. Drawing, designing and building are balanced with research and writing—hands and mind working as one. Students who have an interest in architecture, interior design, construction trades, industrial design, engineering, environmental science, agriculture, resource management, or who simply like to work with the hands and mind should consider taking this course.

DESIGN 2: BUILDING SYSTEMS AND DESIGN: 10,11 (5 Credits)
(FORMERLY SUSTAINABLE DESIGN 2) 10, 11, 12
Preparation: Successful completion of Design 1 or Drafting

Sustainable Design 2 is a continuation of Sustainable Design 1. Design of the environment forms and the basis of understanding human habitation and its impact on the natural world. Students learn the fundamentals of building systems and gain an understanding of structural systems, enclosure systems, and mechanical and environmental systems. Emphasis is placed on passive, regenerative and zero impact systems. Additionally, students will design buildings in the context of a site and a cultural setting. Computer Aided Design (CAD) techniques as well as conventional design and model-building techniques are used to investigate design solutions and communicate design intent.

DESIGN 3: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN BUILDING DESIGN AND SIMULATION (FORMERLY PRINCIPLES OF SUSTAINABILITY) 11, 12 (5 credits)
Preparation: Successful Completion of Design 1(or Drafting) & Design 2

Sustainable Design 3 is a continuation of Sustainable Design 2. Students gain an in-depth understanding of building efficiency and performance through building modeling and simulation Techniques in Building Information Modeling (BIM) are utilized to assess building materials and methods, and life cycle impacts. Energy modeling, passive solar modeling, life cycle analysis are used to optimize building design and minimize, reduce or eliminate ecological impacts.

UNIQUE ELECTIVE AT EAST

SMALL ENGINES: 9,10,11,12 (2.5 credits)

This half year course, will provide the students with an understanding of how small gasoline engines are used to do many different types of work. Students will experiment with CO2 powered vehicles, rocketry, robotics, magnetic levitation, electric motors, and aviation. This course is designed to help students exercise problem solving skills and critical thinking. A hand-on approach will be used to reach these goals. Safety will be emphasized and will be an integral part of each unit.

ART

The Fine Arts Department offers a variety of courses to suit every student’s interests and abilities. All students can achieve success as they explore the arts through a variety of introductory courses that are one or two semesters in length. Interested students can continue their studies through intermediate courses, and serious art students can explore materials in depth through advanced courses as they gain skills and experiences essential to fulfill their individual college/career goals. Courses taken in the Fine Arts Department meet the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.

CORE ART ELECTIVES

FOUNDATIONS OF COMMERCIAL ART: 9, 10, 11, 12 FINE ART 1: (Formerly FOUNDATIONS OF COMMERCIAL ART): (2.5 or 5 credits)

This one semester, 2½-credit course or full year, 5-credit course provides the beginning art student with the opportunity to experience and understand basic art concepts. Drawing, painting, and other related art forms are generated through the development of art ideas and a variety of approaches to design and composition with art media through a multitude of techniques.

FINE ART 2: (Formerly ADVANCED FOUNDATIONS OF COMMERCIAL ART): (5 credits)

This full year course provides the student with an opportunity to further develop the skills for creating drawing, painting, and other related art forms studied in Fine Art 1. Advanced works will result from research relating to subjects in art and a variety of approaches to design. The analysis of historical and contemporary artists’ ideas and styles will support experimentation in form and expression. A multitude of art techniques will be presented to permit the individual art student to strive toward personal exploration and creativity. This course may be taken for a total of three years.

FINE ART 3: (Formerly ADVANCED FOUNDATIONS OF COMMERCIAL ART): (5 credits)

This full year course provides the student with an opportunity to further develop the skills for creating drawing, painting, and other related art forms studied in Fine Art 2. Advanced works will result from research relating to subjects in art and a variety of approaches to design. The analysis of historical and contemporary artists’ ideas and styles will support experimentation in form and expression. A multitude of art techniques will be presented to permit the individual art student to strive toward personal exploration and creativity. This course may be taken for a total of three years.

COMMERCIAL ART 2: 10, 11, 12 (5 or 10 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Fine Art 2

This full-year, single or double period, 5- or 10-credit course provides the student with opportunities to gain further experience by studying examples of commercial art or by illustrating and originating techniques suitable to develop graphic images which can be produced through a variety of printing and color media. The student is guided through the selection of subject matter of personal significance. Illustrations relating to selected themes are planned and created in several forms, styles, and print media. Consultations with the instructor permit the selection of an illustration(s) which will provide the best visual effect if reproduced as a print from silk screen or calligraphy (East). This course may be taken for a total of three years.

THREE DIMENSIONAL ART: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

This full-year, 5-credit course provides the student with the opportunity to study and create art with a concentration on sculpture, ceramics, pottery, and other 3-D media. Material and techniques used by historical and contemporary artists and artisans from a variety of world cultures are introduced to the student for the purpose of exemplifying the subjects and significance of such art forms as they relate to course projects.

THREE DIMENSIONAL ART: 10, 11, 12 INTERMEDIATE THREE DIMENSIONAL ART: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Three Dimensional Art

This full-year course provides the student with the opportunity to study and build upon the techniques introduced in the Three Dimensional Art course. This class will get a more in depth look into clay and various 3D art media as well as researching cultures that use ceramics as an art form. This course will offer a stepping stone into advanced 3D art.

ADVANCED THREE DIMENSIONAL ARTS: 10, 11, 12 ADVANCED THREE DIMENSIONAL ART: 10, 11, 12 (5 or 10 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Intermediate Art

This full-year, single or double period, 5- or 10-credit course provides the student with the opportunity to study and create advanced ceramic, craft, and sculptural forms. Advanced and refined techniques with a variety of materials permit the student to create unique art forms in these areas of three dimensional design. The student may concentrate on one or more projects in any or all areas. This advanced course may be selected by the student for a maximum of three years.

INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: 9, 10, 11, 12 (West); 11, 12 (East) (2.5 credits)

This one-semester, 2½-credit course provides the student with the opportunity to develop visual sensitivity to items and events to be photographed through the study of photographs and photographic processes. The student will learn about the mechanics of equipment and photographic processing of film and prints by using a 35mm camera in a traditional photo studio and darkroom setting. Activities will consist of taking photographs outside of school with the student’s or school’s camera equipment learning the scientific fundamentals of photo and creating graphic art forms and display methods.

INTERMEDIATE COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY:9,10,11,12 (West);11,12 (East) (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Introductory Photography

This one-semester, 2 ½ -credit course provides the student with the opportunity to further develop skills and techniques with photographic equipment and expand experiences from the previous course. This course permits the applications of developed techniques to produce unique photographic art forms. In addition to the traditional processing of 35mm images, digital photography equipment and techniques will be introduced.

ADVANCED COMMERCIALPHOTOGRAPHY: 12 (East); 10, 11, 12 ADVANCED COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: 12 (East); 10,11,12 (West)
(5 or 10 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Intermediate Photography

This full-year, 5-credit course is designed to provide the student with skills and techniques needed to study and produce advanced photographic art. It presents content relating to advanced photography and photojournalism to the experienced photographer as a means of completely rounding his/her education in photographic arts at the high school level. Advanced techniques and processes including different types of paper will be studied. It thoroughly prepares the student for future study in the field. At West, this course may be taken for a total of three years.

AP ART HISTORY: 11, 12 (5 credits)

Advanced Placement History of Art is designed to provide secondary school students with a program similar to an introductory college level course in Art History: An appreciation of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within historical and cultural context. No prior exposure to Art History is required. Students who have done well in history, literature or any studio art forms are encouraged to enroll. This class counts in weighted class rank.

AP STUDIO ART: 11, 12 (5 credits)

Art Studio AP is a full-year course where highly motivated students pursue college-level work in the visual and applied arts. Students are required to develop a concentrated art portfolio, which may be eligible for college credits. Emphasis of the portfolio will focus on a sense of excellence in art, an in-depth commitment to artistic forms, and a variety of diverse media to meet the required standards of the AP program. This course may be taken for two years. This class counts in weighted class rank.

UNIQUE ELECTIVE AT EAST

COMMERCIAL ART 1: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 or 5 credits)

This one-semester, 2 ½ credit course or full-year, 5 credit course, provides the student with the opportunity to develop artistic skills and understanding, which permit the creation of sophisticated and expressive graphic illustrations. The students will explore jewelry making, promotional design concepts, printmaking skills, computer generated design layouts, cartoon illustration, collage and artistic styles to illustrate a logo or message. Students will discover the traditional and modern techniques of creating commercial art.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

ART WORKSHOP: Two Dimensional: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one semester, two and one half credit course will provide any student with a general survey of art and an opportunity to experience and experiment with basic two-dimensional art concepts. Creative activities may consist of painting, drawing, collage, printmaking, or photography. Fundamentals of art will be presented through a variety of techniques, and introduce students to the types of art activities encountered in depth in the full year art courses.

ART WORKSHOP: Three Dimensional: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one semester, two and one half credit course will provide any student with a general survey of art and an opportunity to experience and experiment with basic three-dimensional art concepts. Creative activities may consist of ceramics, textiles, crafts, collage, or sculpture. Fundamentals of art will be presented through a variety of techniques, and introduce students to the types of art activities encountered in depth in the full year art courses.

COMMERCIAL ART: Graphic Design I: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This course will focus on visual communication through commercial graphics and illustration. It will provide the student with the opportunity to explore design in a commercial context through the development of concepts and images. Typography and typographic principles will be introduced and issues of type/image relationships will be explored to enhance communication. The two Commercial Art courses provide a yearlong concentration.

COMMERCIAL ART: Graphic Design II: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

This one semester course will focus on the integration of text, typography, photos, and graphic imagery to creatively solve communication and design problems in advertising and illustration. Students will explore the potential for enhancing creative art concepts through experiences with computer imagery and desktop programs, such as Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Microsoft Publisher. The student will have the opportunity to explore issues of type/image relationships in a commercial context to enhance communication. The two half-year Commercial Art courses at West provide a year-long concentration for the students interested in knowing and creating traditional and current commercial forms of art.


DRAMA/THEATER

CORE DRAMA/THEATER ELECTIVES

LIVING THEATER: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
This is the recommended first course for all students interested in any aspect of theater

This course serves as an introduction to all phases of theater. As a general survey course, it exposes the student to dramatic literature, theatrical terminology and basic acting terminology-. Students will study improvisation and character development. Technical theater is also introduced as students study construction of scenery, lighting, costume and other design techniques. Throughout the course the students will engage in activities which will broaden their creativity and will have opportunities to exercise self expression.

ACTORS STUDIO I: 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: It is recommended that student has taken Living Theatre

Actors Studio I is a course in drama which is divided into two areas of study: the practical and the theoretical. The practical phase involves training in the fundamentals of voice production, the effect of costumes on body movement, and a variety of acting techniques. The theoretical area includes a study of character analysis and interpretation and fundamentals of dramatic criticism.

ACTORS STUDIO II: EAST 11, 12; WEST 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Actors Studio I and Living Theatre

Actors Studio II includes a unit in Stage Management which prepares the student for the organizational aspects of production. It is primarily a course designed for the student who is a more serious actor and anticipates auditioning for a college theater program or expects to pursue acting beyond high school. This course offers intensive exercises in characterization, concentration, dialects, imagination and emotional recall. Close examination of Stanislavsky’s “method acting” prepares the student for practical application of the art of acting through the performance of a full length play as the culminating activity of the course.

PLAY PRODUCTION: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Play Production is a drama course examining the technical aspects of theater. The areas to be studied include scenery production, stage makeup, stage lighting, costuming, properties, and sound. The course will include discussion of the production of a play from auditions through performance as well as the various areas of production management.

PLAY DIRECTING: 11, 12 (2.5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Actors Studio I and II and Living Theatre

In this course, students will gain insight into the purpose of a director and develop those skills which will enable them to direct a play artistically, create a concept for visual effect, establish an inner rhythm for performance, instruct actors, and fuse all contributing production elements into one harmonious whole. The students will direct scene projects and have the opportunity to apply to direct the all-school one-act plays.

PUBLIC SPEAKING: 9, 10, 11, 12 (2.5 credits)

Public Speaking enables students of all ability levels to gain confidence and poise when speaking in both small and large group situations. The student will learn the strategies and techniques of effective speaking then practice their speaking skills in a variety of real life situations. These include, but are not limited to, interviews, acceptance speeches, presentations, impromptu situations, and persuasive speeches. Students will participate in a culminating activity by staging a formal debate based on policy format with topics related to current affairs.

MUSIC

Instrumental Ensembles

Choir Ensembles

Music Theory

Freshman Wind Ensemble**

Vocal Workshop

Music Theory I

Symphonic Band

Concert Choir

AP Music Theory

Wind Ensemble

Chansons


Orchestra

East -West Singers


** Unique elective at East

CORE ELECTIVES

INSTRUMENTAL

EAST ORCHESTRA: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Orchestra is for those students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass. These students will perform at concerts and will have a small group lesson on the rotating music schedule. The Orchestra wind and percussion players are members of the Wind Ensemble and rehearse separately during the Wind Ensemble period. It is, therefore, necessary for the full symphonic orchestra (strings, winds, percussion) to rehearse after school or evenings prior to a performance. Students will perform in concerts in and out of school. Grading is based on: participation, lessons, testing, and rehearsal and concert attendance.

WEST ORCHESTRA: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

West Orchestra is open to any student in grades 9-12 who plays a string instrument (violin, viola, cello, string bass). NO AUDITION IS REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS CLASS!

EAST WIND ENSEMBLE: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of audition

These outstanding instrumentalists are chosen by audition to study and perform music literature that is scored for the wind ensemble idiom. The instrumentation is identical to that of a symphonic band, except that frequently there is only one player on the part. Students in this organization perform at assembly programs, concerts, recitals, and state festivals. A weekly small class ensemble is provided for students on a rotating schedule. Students will perform in concerts in and out of school. Grading is based on: participation, lessons, testing and rehearsal and concert attendance.

WEST WIND ENSEMBLE: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of an audition for students in grades 9-12

Incoming freshmen can audition based on a recommendation from their middle school band director. If the student does not successfully complete the audition they may still take the Symphonic Band class.

EAST SYMPHONIC BAND: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of audition

Auditions for Symphonic Band are held annually. Students in this organization perform at assembly programs, concerts and recitals. A weekly small class ensemble is provided for students on the rotating music lesson schedule.

WEST SYMPHONIC BAND: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

The Symphonic Band at West is open to any interested student in grades 9-12 that has previous experience on a musical instrument (excluding guitar and piano). NO AUDITION IS REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS CLASS! West Marching Band, Jazz Ensemble (audition required), Pit Orchestra (director recommendation), Wire Choir and Small Ensembles are co-curricular activities that meet after the regular school day.

VOCAL

VOCAL WORKSHOP: 9, 10, 11, 12 (Full year course) (5 credits)
No audition is required to participate in this class.

Vocal Workshop is for men and women who enjoy singing for social as well as aesthetic reasons. A balanced variety of vocal repertoire is experienced, stressing vocal, choral and sight-reading techniques. Students will develop the knowledge and skills that strengthen their aesthetic musical awareness. They will develop the ability to evaluate and demonstrate an appreciation for, music as an art form, and music related careers. Students will develop an understanding of the potential for music in interdisciplinary relationship with all curricula. The students will receive a sectional lesson on the rotating music schedule. Vocal Workshop will perform at concerts in and outside of school. There will be at least one after school rehearsal prior to the major concerts. Grading is based on: class participation, lessons, written work, vocal testing and rehearsal and concert attendance.

CHANSONS: 10, 11, 12 (Full year course) (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Audition and one year high school choral experience

Chansons is a balanced group of mature soprano and alto voices. Octavos and major forms of the choral tradition for treble voices are studied, stressing vocal, choral and sight-reading techniques. Students will develop the knowledge and skills that strengthen their aesthetic musical awareness. They will develop the ability to evaluate and demonstrate an appreciation for, music as an art form, and music related careers. Students will develop an understanding of the potential for music in interdisciplinary relationship with all curricula. The students will receive a sectional lesson on the rotating music schedule. Chansons will perform at concerts in and outside of school. There will be at least one after school rehearsal prior to the major concerts. Grading is based on: class participation, lessons, written work, vocal testing and rehearsal and concert attendance.

CONCERT CHOIR: 10, 11, 12 (Full year course) (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Audition and one year high school choral experience

Concert Choir is a balanced group of men and women with developed voices. Octavos and major forms of the choral tradition are studied, stressing vocal, choral and sight-reading techniques. Students will develop the knowledge and skills that strengthen their aesthetic musical awareness. They will develop the ability to evaluate and demonstrate an appreciation for, music as an art form, and music related careers. Students will develop an understanding of the potential for music in interdisciplinary relationship with all curricula. The students will receive a sectional lesson on the rotating music schedule. Concert Choir will perform at concerts in and outside of school. There will be at least one after school rehearsal prior to the major concerts. Grading is based on: class participation, lessons, written work, vocal testing and rehearsal and concert attendance.

EAST/WEST SINGERS: 10, 11, 12 (Full year course) (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Audition and one year high school choral experience

Singers is a balanced group of men and women with the most highly developed voices. Octavos and major forms of the choral tradition are studied, stressing vocal, choral and sight-reading techniques. Students will develop the knowledge and skills that strengthen their aesthetic musical awareness. They will develop the ability to evaluate and demonstrate an appreciation for, music as an art form, and music related careers. Students will develop an understanding of the potential for music in interdisciplinary relationship with all curricula. The students will receive a sectional lesson on the rotating music schedule. Singers will perform at concerts in and outside of school. There will be at least one after school rehearsal prior to the major concerts. Grading is based on: class participation, lessons, written work, vocal testing and rehearsal and concert attendance.

CORE ELECTIVES

THEORY AND PRACTICE

AP MUSIC THEORY: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Music Theory I

The goal of AP Music Theory is to instill mastery of the basic elements of music and progress to creative tasks in composition, orchestration, harmonic analysis, and twentieth century compositional styles and techniques. AP students are encouraged to participate in the AP Music theory test. This class counts in weighted class rank.

MUSIC THEORY: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Should be able to read pitches and rhythms in treble or bass clefs

In this course, the student explores the basic elements of music theory and harmony. The student's ability to hear and interpret pitch and rhythm is improved through music dictation and solfeggio (sight singing). It is a helpful course for those students interested in becoming better performers and an essential course for those intending post high school musical study.

UNIQUE ELECTIVE AT EAST

FRESHMAN WIND ENSEMBLE: 9 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Ability to play a wind instrument at the high school level

This ensemble is for the freshman student who plays a wind, brass, or percussion instrument, Freshman Wind Ensemble at East offers an opportunity to perform with others to improve musically, to explore new styles of music, and to express oneself creatively. The wind ensemble rehearses daily as a class, and there is a weekly small group rotating music lesson lab. Students will perform in concerts in and out of school. Grading is based on: participation, lessons, testing and rehearsal and concert attendance. There is no audition requirement for this ensemble.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS

The primary objectives of the music curriculum are to develop musical proficiency, to foster self expression through group activity, to encourage public performance, to acquire knowledge of careers in music, and to develop a lifelong appreciation of music.

World Language

CORE CHINESE ELECTIVES

CHINESE I A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 Credits)

Chinese I is the first course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are beginning their study of Chinese, students will learn to use the language meaningfully and begin to develop the facility to communicate in the Chinese-speaking world. Students are introduced to the basic speech and pronunciation patterns through intensified practice in listening and speaking. Reading and writing are introduced as an extension of listening and speaking to facilitate multiple forms of communication. Activities are designed to allow students to use the language to their fullest potential.

CHINESE 2 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (5 Credits)

Chinese 2 is the second course in the multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are continuing their study of Chinese, this course involves an extension of all the principles taught in the first level of Chinese. An understanding and facility in using the language, an emphasis on the refinement of basic reading skills, continual development of writing skills, and a continued study of the important aspects of Chinese life and culture are emphasized. Activities provide for a continued effort in the development the students’ ability to express ideas in Chinese and to think in the target language.

CORE FRENCH ELECTIVES

FRENCH 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

French 1 is the first course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are beginning their study of French, students will learn to use the language meaningfully and begin to develop the facility to communicate in the French-speaking world. Students are introduced to the basic speech and pronunciation patterns through intensified practice in listening and speaking. Reading and writing are introduced as an extension of listening and speaking to facilitate multiple forms of communication. Activities are designed to allow students to use the language to their fullest potential.

FRENCH 2 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of middle school sequence or French 1

French 2 is the second course in the multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are continuing their study of French, this course involves an extension of all the principles taught in the first level of French. An understanding and facility in using the language, an emphasis on the refinement of basic reading skills, continual development of writing skills, and a continued study of the important aspects of French life and culture are emphasized. Activities provide for a continued effort in the development the students’ ability to express ideas in French and to think in the target language.

FRENCH 3 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of French 2

This course offers extensive oral practice in the language through class conversation, question and answer sessions, role playing and improvisational situations. Grammatical concepts are reviewed and more complex structures are introduced. Readings will include excerpts from French literature as well as current magazine and newspaper articles. Writing skills will be stressed through regular composition work. The class will be conducted in French, bien entendu!

FRENCH 4 A / H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of French 3 H or 3 A with teacher recommendation

Students who have attained this level of proficiency will now be able to express themselves more accurately in French. Class discussions are based on articles from French newspapers and magazines, on short stories by leading French authors, and on works dealing with various aspects of French and Francophone life. Active participation is encouraged through individual reports and class presentations. Composition work stresses style in the expression of personal ideas. The class will be conducted in French.

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of French 4H

In AP French, emphasis will be on: (1) reinforcement of the students' ability to communicate and express ideas, feelings, and emotions, both in reading and in writing: (2) reading and interpreting representative works of French and Francophone writers while gaining an understanding of selected literary movements and their cultural significance: (3) study of selected aspects of the arts and (4) contemporary social values as seen through the media. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in French language. The class will be conducted in French.

FRENCH 5 A: 12 (5 credits)

PREPARATION: Successful completion of French 4 A

French 5 A focuses on reinforcing the student's' ability to communicate and express their ideas, feelings and opinions, both orally and in writing. Oral reports on literary and cultural topics as well as personal experiences will be presented. Readings will include essays, short stories, plays and poetry, with writing and speaking activities generated from the readings. A review and expansion of major grammatical elements will form another segment of the course. The class will be conducted in French.

CORE SPANISH ELECTIVES

SPANISH 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Spanish 1 is the first course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are new to the study of Spanish, students will learn to use the language meaningfully and begin to develop the facility to communicate in the Spanish-speaking world. Students are introduced to the basic speech and pronunciation patterns through intensified practice in listening and speaking. Activities are designed to allow students to use the language to their fullest potential in a culturally appropriate fashion.

SPANISH 2 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Completion of middle school sequence or Spanish 1

Spanish 2 is the second course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are continuing their study of Spanish, this course involves an extension of all the principles taught in the first level of Spanish. An understanding and facility in using the

language, an emphasis on the refinement of basic reading skills, a continual development of writing skills, and a continued study of the important aspects of Hispanic life and culture are emphasized. Activities provide for a continued effort in the development of the students’ ability to express ideas in Spanish and to think in the target language.

SPANISH 3 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Spanish 2H or 2A with teacher recommendation

This course offers extensive oral practice in the language through class conversations, question and answer sessions, and group work. Grammatical concepts are reviewed and more complex grammatical structures are introduced. Readings include excerpts from Hispanic literature as well as current magazine articles featuring aspects of daily life in the Hispanic world. Writing skills are stressed through composition work. The class is conducted in Spanish.

SPANISH 4 A / H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Spanish 3 H or 3A with teacher recommendation

In this fourth year Spanish course, special attention is given to the synthesis and connection of all the content and skills acquired in the first three years of language study. Based on a learner-centered curriculum, students will work on projects which are interesting and relevant to them, so that they can use Spanish to communicate with native speakers, both orally and in writing. The class is conducted in Spanish.

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Spanish 4 AP/4H with teacher recommendation

The content of this course is largely determined by the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Course description, published each year by the College Board. The fifth year student will gain greater competence in Spanish in this intensive, rigorous college level curriculum by: (1) discussing literary and cultural topics, current events, and personal experiences with a high degree of structural accuracy and fluency; (2) reading selected newspaper and magazine articles, literary prose and poetry; (3) writing expository compositions expressing ideas, feelings, and opinions with a high degree of structural accuracy. The language and literature are studied as an expression of the fundamental values of Hispanic cultures. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in Spanish language. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

SPANISH 5 A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Spanish 4 A

This course has a conversational emphasis. Students will form groups to study subjects of interest to them. Topics may include academic subjects (biology, sociology, environmental studies, etc.) or career-oriented topics such as law, medicine, business, or information technology. Using student-driven thematic units, students will learn to speak and write appropriately in selected situations. The class is conducted in Spanish.

UNIQUE ELECTIVES AT WEST

SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS INTERMEDIATE
LEVEL 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Teacher recommendation

Spanish for Heritage Speakers is designed to develop oral, aural, reading, and written language skills at a very challenging level in a language in which a student has already demonstrated proficiency. One of the goals of the course is to prepare the student in Spanish in academic and professional settings. The cultural knowledge of the students will serve as the base to expand their understanding of the various Spanish-speaking cultures. Analysis of authentic Spanish literature will be a major component of the course.

SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS INTERMEDIATE
LEVEL 2 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of a Spanish for Heritage Speakers course or teacher recommendation

Spanish for Heritage Speakers 2 continues the development of oral, aural, reading, and written skills at a very challenging level begun in the previous course. The development of a more formal usage of the language is emphasized. The student will analyze literary and cultural topics, current events, and personal experiences at a more sophisticated level. The reading and analysis of authentic literature will continue to be a major component of the course. This will be a learner-centered curriculum in which students will have the opportunity to design their own thematic units.

SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS INTERMEDIATE
LEVEL 3 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of a Spanish for Heritage Speakers course or teacher recommendation

Spanish for Heritage Speakers 3 continues the development of oral, aural, reading, and written skills at a very challenging level begun in the previous course. The development of more formal usage of the language is emphasized. The student will analyze literary and cultural topics, current events, and personal experiences at a more sophisticated level. The reading and analysis of authentic literature will continue to be a major component of the course. This will be learner-centered curriculum in which students will have the opportunity to design their own thematic units.


CORE LATIN ELECTIVES

LATIN 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Latin 1 A / H is the first year course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who want to explore ancient Greco-Roman culture and development of language skills, this introductory course exposes students to the goals established by the National Standards. 1) Reading as a primary tool of communication, which is enhanced by oral skills such as recitation and by writing. 2) Developing an awareness of other people’s world view as well as learn about contributions of other cultures to the world at large and the solutions they offer to common problems. 3) Understanding of contemporary culture by making connections and comparing the ancient culture with their own. 4) Developing strategies for encountering new language learning situations and other cultures.

LATIN 2 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Latin IH or teacher recommendation

Latin 2 is the second course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who want to continue their exploration of ancient Greco-Roman culture and further develop language skills, this course expands on the goals established by the National Standards. 1) Reading and analysis of texts as a primary tool of communication that is enhanced by oral skills such as recitation and by writing. 2) Developing an awareness of other people’s world views as well as learn about contributions of other cultures to the world at large and the solutions they offer to common problems of humankind. 3) Understanding of contemporary culture by making connections and comparing the ancient culture with their own. 4) Expanding strategies for encountering new language learning situations and other cultures.

LATIN 3 A / H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Latin 2 H or teacher recommendation

Students study a variety of genres and authors. This third-year course introduces students to a well-rounded experience with classical literature with emphasis on Vergil, Catullus, Ovid, Horace, et al.

AP LATIN: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Latin 3 H or teacher recommendation

Students study a variety of genres and authors. This fourth-year course completes a student’s well-rounded experience with classical literature with emphasis on Vergil, Catullus, Ovid, Horace, et al. The primary difference between this and its A-level alternative is that here students are held to a much higher level of expectations sufficient to prepare them for AP testing at the end of this year of study. It is strongly recommended that students make challenging preparations for the rigors of AP Latin.

LATIN 4 A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Latin 3 A or teacher recommendation

Students study a variety of genres and authors. The fourth-year course completes a student’s well-rounded experience with classical literature with emphasis on Vergil, Catullus, Ovid, Horace, et al.


UNIQUE GERMAN ELECTIVES AT EAST

GERMAN 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

German 1 is the first course in the multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are new to the study of German, this fast-paced course involves an in-depth study of German. The students will be introduced to German through Comprehensible Input, which involves reading, watching and listening to high-interest materials to build a groundwork of language. There is emphasis on the co-construction of class stories. Minds-on engagement in level one is key to success in higher levels. Class activities provide for development of the students’ ability to express ideas in German and think in the target language.

GERMAN 2 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of German 1H or 1A with teacher recommendation

German 2 is the second course in the multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are continuing their study of German, this course involves a continuation of Comprehensible Input methodologies from the first year of German. A growing understanding and facility in using the language, an emphasis on the refinement of reading skills with several culturally authentic readers, continued development of writing skills and more in-depth study of the important aspects of German life and culture are emphasized. Activities provide for a continued effort in the development of the students’ ability to express ideas in German and to think in the target language.

GERMAN 3 A / H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of German 2H or 2A with teacher recommendation

This course offers continued and more intense study of the German language via Comprehensible Input. Reading and listening texts for and from native speakers are used more extensively. Oral practice in the language through class conversations, question and answer sessions, and group and pair work is a crucial part of this course. With two years of Comprehensible Input behind them, students will have the tools to deal with grammar concepts, which will be explicitly taught as needed for the sake of communication. are reviewed and more complex grammatical structures are introduced. Writing skills are stressed through regular journals, thematic- and free-writes, guided essays, and more. The class is conducted in German.

AP GERMAN LANGUAGE & CULTURE: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of German 3H with teacher recommendation

The content of this course is largely determined by the Advanced Placement German Language and Culture course description, published each year by the College Board. The fourth-year student will gain greater competence in German by: (1) discussing literary and cultural topics, current events and personal experiences; (2) reading selected newspaper and magazine articles, literary prose and poetry; (3) writing compositions with a high degree of structural accuracy. The language and literature are studied as an expression of the fundamental values of German, Austrian, and Swiss cultures. This course will be conducted entirely in German.

GERMAN 4 A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of German 3

The course has been divided into five units of work: a review of grammar structures; readings by twentieth century authors including Brecht, Duerrenmatt and Frisch; a short overview of German history; a brief summary of German literature from 1750-1850; and a study of current cultural, political, economic, and social issues. Students must be able to work independently during the year. A term paper on a selected topic is required. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam.

UNIQUE ITALIAN ELECTIVES AT WEST

ITALIAN 1 A / H: 9, 10, 11, 12 (5 credits)

Italian 1 is the first course in a multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are new to the study of Italian, students will learn to use the language meaningfully and begin to develop the facility to communicate in the Italian-speaking world. Students are introduced to the basic speech and pronunciation patterns through intensified practice in listening and speaking. Reading and writing are introduced as an extension of listening and speaking. Activities are designed to allow students to use the language to their fullest potential in a culturally appropriate fashion.

ITALIAN 2 A / H: 10, 11, 12 (Carries H level credit) (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Italian 1 with teacher recommendation

Novice 2 H Italian is the second course in the multi-year sequence. Designed for students who are continuing their study of Italian, this course involves an in-depth extension of all the principles taught in the first level of Italian. A deeper understanding and facility in using the language, an emphasis on the refinement of reading skills with extensive culturally authentic pieces, an intense development of writing skills, and a profound study of the important aspects of Italian life and culture are emphasized. Activities provide for a continued effort in the development the students’ ability to express ideas in Italian and to think in the target language.

ITALIAN 3 A / H: 11, 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Italian 2 H or 2 A with teacher recommendation

The Italian 3 course is aimed at refining the basic language skills. Major emphasis is placed on developing listening comprehension, increasing fluency in the spoken language, refining writing skills, reviewing previously acquired grammatical concepts, and introducing new, more complex structures. Students will be required to write compositions, making use of the themes and vocabulary introduced in each chapter unit. Italian culture and pertinent political and literary developments of modern Italy are studied and discussed. The class will be conducted mostly in Italian.

AP ITALIAN: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Italian 3H

The content of this course is largely determined by the Advanced Placement Italian Language course description, published each year by the College Board. The fourth-year student will gain greater competence in Italian by: (1) discussing literary and cultural topics, current events and personal experiences; (2) reading selected newspaper and magazine articles, literary prose and poetry; (3) writing compositions with a high degree of structural accuracy. The language and literature are studied as an expression of the fundamental values of the Italian culture. This course will be conducted entirely in Italian.

ITALIAN 4A: 12 (5 credits)
PREPARATION: Successful completion of Italian 3A

The Italian 4 course aims to increase the student’s comprehension of spoken Italian; to further develop their ability to speak the language; to enable them to read selected literary texts and current materials; to express themselves in written form in grammatically correct and idiomatic Italian. Italian culture and pertinent political, social and literary development of contemporary Italy are discussed. The class will be conducted in Italian.

Sequencing Charts